summer of the 17th doll
News, Performing arts, Reviews, Theatre

Black Swan’s Doll is a revelation

Review: Black Swan State Theatre Company, Summer of the Seventeenth Doll  ·
Heath Ledger Theatre, May 9 ·
Review by Xan Ashbury ·

It’s not often a play’s set makes me analyse my obsession with mid-century furniture. But such is the case with Black Swan State Theatre Company’s stunning production of The Doll (as it is affectionately known). From the standard lamp and floral velour sofa, to the vinyl pouffe and the laminex table, the set closely resembles my home’s interior. It caused me to ponder why I have compulsively acquired items from an era steeped in such conservative values.

Ah, nostalgia; that trap of rosy retrospection.

Ray Lawler’s classic play Summer of the Seventeenth Doll, set in 1953 and first performed in ‘55, speaks of the unbearable nostalgia and the confusion of a group of people when their beloved private world disintegrates under the stress of time and shifting circumstances. It examines what happens when people cling to the past out of fear of an uncertain future.

It is also a tragedy of the inarticulate, who feel more than they can express. Emotional honesty or nuanced vocabulary – like job security or savings – is a distant luxury.

Like generations of Australians, I read The Doll at school. But in my Year 11 drama room in 1989, its outdated colloquial language just seemed cringeworthy. (“Pigs I will!”, “Real ear-basher, he is.”) Its themes were utterly lost on us. Amateur productions I’ve seen were tragically shouty.

But finally, (finally!) I get it. I appreciate the brilliance of Lawler’s text, thanks to Adam Mitchell’s sensitive direction, the luminous design by Bruce McKinven and Trent Suidgeest, and the quality of the acting.

summer of the seventeenth doll
Mackenzie Dunn exudes a warm charm as Bubba, pictured with Kelton Pell as Roo (left) and Jacob Allan as Barney (right). Photo: Philip Gostelow.

Amy Mathews is superb as the sunny (but ultimately distraught) thirty-something barmaid Olive, who lives with her ageing, acerbic mother Emma (Vivienne Garrett) in a Victorian terrace in Carlton. Olive swoons adoringly, as she awaits the arrival of Roo and his mate Barney, down from cane cutting in Queensland for the five-month lay-off season. It’s been rinse-repeat for the past sixteen summers: Roo teaming up with Olive and Barney with Nancy. But with Nancy now married and sceptical Pearl invited as a possible replacement, it’s time to enter the spin cycle.

Kelton Pell is convincing as the proud, hot-headed Roo, who has returned to Melbourne stripped of his status, money and dignity. Machismo renders him all but mute (“Whatever. Don’t much care.”) until he vents with his fists.

Jacob Allan is outstanding in the role of Barney, a lively, un-reconstructed “ladies man” whose lack of self-awareness provides much of the play’s humour.

Alison van Reeken does well to portray the highly-strung widow Pearl, whose fresh perspective on the men’s behaviour, and the group’s dynamic, accelerates inevitable change.

Michael Cameron swaggers as Roo’s rival, the young upstart Johnnie Dowd. Mackenzie Dunn exudes a warm charm as Bubba, whose attraction to Johnnie shocks the other characters into confronting some home truths.

summer of the seventeenth doll
Machismo renders Roo all but mute until he vents with his fists. L-R: Jacob Allan as Barney and Kelton Pell as Roo. Photo: Philip Gostelow.

Of course, staging (and viewing) The Doll now is more than an act of nostalgia. The rise of the fly-in, fly-out lifestyle, and the challenge that poses for couples and families, adds contemporary resonance. So too does society’s growing critique of toxic masculinity.

Lawler’s characters are full of ambiguity and contradiction, though, and he resists moralising. Take Roo’s act of continuing to give Olive kewpie dolls: is it sweet, or infantilising – like some sugar (cane) daddy?

Olive’s rejection of marriage reminds me somewhat of Nora in Ibsen’s Doll House. When Nora says she cannot be a good wife and mother without learning to be more than a plaything, her husband is baffled because it contradicts all he has been taught about women. Likewise, Roo is at a loss to understand why Olive would not want to be his wife.

Does happiness elude her because she has been treated as a plaything and come to expect no better, or does she genuinely want to live beyond the trappings of marriage? Surely some women still grapple with the same question.

My only connection to Queensland or the world of cane-cutting has been through my long-standing love of the Go-Betweens’ song “Cattle and Cane”. Grant McLennan’s lyrics drip with affection and longing; nostalgia and melancholy. “From time to time the waste, memory wastes (memory wastes).”

I can’t be sure what McLennan means by those lines, though I’ve sung them with conviction countless times. But given that he wrote the song on Nick Cave’s guitar in London while feeling homesick for rural Queensland…

Perhaps there’s something in that for Olive and Roo and Barney and all of us. Memory lies. Memory wastes. The past was not necessarily a better place.

Summer of the Seventeenth Doll plays the Heath Ledger Theatre at the State Theatre Centre until May 20.

Top: Sensitive design and quality acting: Amy Mathews as Olive and Alison van Reeken as Pearl. Photo: Photo: Philip Gostelow.

 

 

Frank Enstein
April 18, Calendar

Dance: Frank Enstein

11 – 15 April @ State Theatre Centre of WA , Heath Ledger Theatre ·
Presented by Co3 Australia ·

School Matinees: Thu 12 and Fri 13 April
Evening Performances: Wed 11 – Sat 14 April, 7.30pm and Sun 15 April, 5pm

Made by The Farm in collaboration with Co3 Australia

Frank could be a genius. Just one more ‘i’ and he’d be an Einstein!

Frank’s a lonely guy who wants to make his imaginary friends real. Harnessing electricity from a storm he creates his world from nothing but his imagination and the garbage in his lab. Battling a physical impairment, Frank creates monsters to fulfill his desire to be normal and to be accepted by others. Can he control what he creates? And who is the real monster anyway? Frank Enstein is a retelling of the classic tale for children and adults – magical dance-theatre illuminating a path to self-acceptance.

The Farm’s wicked sense of humour together with the extreme physicality of Co3 Australia’s dancers combines magic and dance to create a show for the child in all of us.

Suitable for all ages: recommended Ages 8+ (when accompanied by an adult)

Duration: 60 minutes (no interval)

More info: https://co3.org.au/frank-enstein-2018/
Email: info@co3.org.au

Top: The monsters Frank brings to life. Photo: Stefan Gosatti.

William Rees as Frank with Co3 Australia dancer Andrew Searle
Children, Dance, News, Performing arts, Reviews

A winning reinvention

Review: Frank Enstein, The Farm with Co3 Australia ·
State Theatre Centre of WA, 12 February ·
Review by Nina Levy ·

When I first heard that Co3 Australia was remounting Frank Enstein, I was sceptical. A retelling of Mary Shelley’s gothic classic by Gold Coast-based duo The Farm, the work made its premiere in WA just a year ago and it felt too soon to watch it again.

My fears, however, were unfounded. Watching Frank Enstein “2.0” (to borrow Co3 executive director Richard Longbottom’s nickname for the show) it was apparent that this is, indeed, a new version of the work rather than a simple reproduction.

The bones of the story are the same as last time. Frank’s a lonely inventor with a physical impairment who creates monsters in an effort to find friends. It’s a tale about acceptance, of both others and ourselves. Frank’s workshop, with its electric generator, crate of mannequin parts, fluorescent signs and AstroTurf surrounds, is also familiar.

So far, so recognisable, but there’s one key difference this year. Two of the five characters, Frank and his romantic interest Liz, are played by teenagers rather than adults. While the recast was made for practical rather than creative reasons (lack of availability of the original Frank, Daniel Monks), the decision to replace them with young performers has worked a charm.

As in the first rendition, both Frank and Liz are a sweet mix of awkwardness, enthusiasm and eccentricity. Casting them as teenagers gives a context for their idiosyncrasies that makes them more relatable.

William Rees as Frank with Co3 Australia guest artist Luci Young
William Rees as Frank with Co3 Australia guest artist Luci Young. Photo: Stefan Gosatti.

Guest artists William Rees (Frank), 16, and Luci Young (Liz), 15,  have put their own spin on their respective characters. Both gave highly engaging performances on opening night, at once comical and sensitive.

As Frank, Rees had the audience giggling as he ricocheted between triumph and terror, interacting with his newly enlivened creatures. Like Monks, Rees has a physical disability, in his case restricting the use of his left arm. As in the first version of Frank Enstein, the difference between Frank’s arms is acknowledged in a moment that is deft and poignant, without being overly sentimental.

Young’s Liz was full of delightful bravura, whether tossing her head wildly to the instructions of an “advanced at-home dance class” issuing from her old-school ghetto blaster or losing herself in a spine rippling solo, performed with an exuberance and abandonment beyond her years.

As well as cast changes, there have been adjustments to both the narrative and choreography, making this version of Frank Enstein that little bit darker and kookier. The “vacuum cleaner scene” was, if anything, even funnier on second viewing, as various body parts fell victim to the power of suction. I don’t seem to recall a disco scene in last year’s version, but it shone golden this time.

Once again, guest artist Andrew Searle and Co3 Australia’s Zachary Lopez and Talitha Maslin were sensational as the three monsters. Wonderfully funny in their interactions with one another and with Rees and Young, it was in their solos that we saw their incredible physicality as movers. Searle moved through his mass of spirals with his trademark grace. Lopez both amused and amazed as a series of crazed vibrations overtook his body. And Maslin appeared inhuman, her limbs contorting at seemingly impossible angles.

Finally, mention must be made of the sound design, with its evocative layers of melody and machinery, created by James Brown with Laurie Sinagra.

Kudos to the creators of this work, The Farm’s Gavin Webber and Grayson Millwood, as well its cast – Frank Enstein 2.0 won me over.

Frank Enstein plays until 15 April and is suitable for ages 8 to adults.

Read Seesaw’s interview with Co3 Australia’s artistic director Raewyn Hill to find out more about Frank Enstein.

Pictured top: William Rees as Frank with Co3 Australia dancer Andrew Searle. Photo: Stefan Gosatti.

In the Next Room, or the Vibrator Play
Calendar, November 18, October 18, Performing arts, Theatre

Theatre: In the Next Room, or the Vibrator Play

20 October 20 – 4 November @ State Theatre Centre of Western Australia ·
Presented by Black Swan State Theatre Company ·

IN THE NEXT ROOM, OR
THE VIBRATOR PLAY
by Sarah Ruhl
20 OCT to 04 NOV
HEATH LEDGER THEATRE

In the Next Room, or The Vibrator Play is a sassy play about power and passion. Sarah Ruhl re-imagines the curious chapter in the early history of psychotherapy, when women were treated with a certain mechanical device. And thus began the peculiar history of the vibrator…

Set in the 1880s, just after the advent of electricity, In the Next Room takes place in the adjoining parlour and consulting room of Dr Givings, who specialises in treating “hysteria” in women. Brisk, clinical and efficient in manner, he obsesses on the marvels of technology and what it can do for his patients. Although highly observant, he fails to notice that his wife, Catherine, is feeling neglected. Seeking the companionship of her husband’s patients, she soon begins to discover the truth about what goes on ‘in the next room’.

A fantastically funny and marvellously entertaining bodice ripper about true love and orgasms. Nominated for three Tony Awards and a Pulitzer Prize, this is a play guaranteed to hit the spot!
“Insightful, fresh and funny, the play is as rich in thought as it is in feeling.” New York Times

DIRECTOR Jeffrey Jay Fowler
SET & COSTUME DESIGNER Alicia Clements
LIGHTING DESIGNER Lucy Birkinshaw
COMPOSER/SOUND DESIGNER Ash Gibson Greig
CAST INCLUDES Rebecca Davis, Jo Morris, Tariro Mavondo
SUITABILITY 16+
WARNING Adult themes

Black Swan State Theatre Company presents
IN THE NEXT ROOM, OR THE VIBRATOR PLAY by Sarah Ruhl
DATES: 20 OCT – 04 NOV 2018
VENUE: Heath Ledger Theatre, State Theatre Centre of WA
WARNING: Adult themes

Prices: $35.00 to $88.00

Book via www.bsstc.com.au

More information at www.bsstc.com.au/plays/in-the-next-room-or-the-vibrator-play
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https://instagram.com/blackswanstc/
https://vimeo.com/blackswanstc

More info: www.bsstc.com.au/plays/in-the-next-room-or-the-vibrator-play

A Farewell to Paper
News, Performing arts, Reviews, Theatre

Of typewriters and telegrams

Perth Festival review: A Farewell to Paper ·
Heath Ledger Theatre, 17 February ·
Review by Nina Levy ·

In 1982 I was seven years old and learning to write with a fountain pen at my primary school in the UK. It’s not something I’ve thought about for decades but when Evgeny Grishkovets pulled out a sheet of blotting paper at A Farewell to Paper last night, I was suddenly remembering my own blotting paper; its mottled texture, its pink hue, my attendant anxiety about handling the strange pen nib. Sitting in the theatre, struck by this long-forgotten memory, it occurred to me that I must have been part of the dying throes of an era, one of the last school children to learn to use a fountain pen.

It’s this passing of an era that Grishkovets is marking in A Farewell to Paper. Both written and performed by Grishkovets, it’s a monologue (of sorts) that plays tribute to paper and its traditions. Behind him, five doors act as portals to the paper past; in the foreground, a writing desk is almost drowned in vintage accoutrements of communication (plus laptop). Typewriters, telegrams, aerogrammes, newspapers, books… some are gone, some are going and Grishkovets wants us to consider what we’re losing as we move into an age where draft copies don’t exist, where we no longer recognise a loved one’s handwriting, where our memories are no longer stored in shoe boxes but on external hard drives.

It’s poignant but light-hearted; telegrams and texts are held up for comparison (“A man didn’t get drunk and send a whole heap of telegrams to his exes”), the postal system of the past is admired (“Here in Perth you have a magnificent old post office and now it is… a supermarket? No! Worse, it is an H&M!”).

A Russian author, director and actor, Grishkovets delivers the show in his native tongue, with a live translator and interpreter, a role taken for this season by former Australian diplomat and Australian National University fellow at the Centre for European Studies, Kyle Wilson. Although it doesn’t appear that performing arts has been part of Wilson’s extensive professional experience, he is completely at ease in this role, managing not just the nuances of translation, but numerous hilarious interactions with Grishkovets, with aplomb.

At just over two hours with no interval, the only criticism to be made of A Farewell to Paper is that it felt very long. Grishkovets must realise this; he warns the audience of the work’s length at its outset and, amusingly, provides reassurances, at various intervals, that the show IS going to finish after two hours, as promised. The nature of the work, which doesn’t have a clear story arc but instead follows a meandering path through Grishkovets’ memories and musings, is charming. Nonetheless, it would, perhaps, be more effective with some culling to keep it under the 90-minute mark.

Even if he doesn’t have every audience member in the palm of his hand for the work’s entire length, Grishkovets is an endearing and engaging performer. As a solo show, A Farewell to Paper is a remarkable achievement, a whimsical and timely reflection on an age that has almost disappeared.

‘A Farewell to Paper’ closes 18 February.

Pictured top are Evgeny Grishkovets (foreground) and Kyle Wilson (background) in ‘A Farewell to Paper’ at the Heath Ledger Theatre. Photo: Toni Wilkinson.

Attractor
Dance, Features, Music, News, Performing arts

Super attractor

Propelling its dancers into a state of ecstatic physical abandonment, Attractor has been a hit at festivals in the Eastern states. Ahead of the work’s Perth Festival season, Nina Levy spoke to co-director and co-choreographer Gideon Obarzanek to find out more.

Gideon Obarzanek
“Attractor really blurs the line between professional and amateur, between performer and audience.”  Gideon Obarzanek

The creative team behind the dance work Attractor is something of a super group. Directed and choreographed by two of Australia’s best-loved dance makers, Gideon Obarzanek and Lucy Guerin, and presented by two renowned Australian dance companies, Dancenorth and Lucy Guerin Inc, the work is also a collaboration with Indonesian music duo Senyawa, who fuse traditional folk music with sounds borrowed from heavy metal bands.

With such a stellar creative line-up, perhaps it’s no surprise that Attractor, a contemporary interpretation of the Javanese tradition of entering trance through dance and music, has garnered praise from audiences and critics alike, taking out the 2017 Helpmann Awards for Best Choreography and Best Dance Production.

Attractor really blurs the line between professional and amateur, between performer and audience,” muses Gideon Obarzenek, as he reflects on the work’s success. 
“Senyawa play live and they’re really charismatic, powerful performers. So really it’s also a music concert. And then the virtuosity of the Dancenorth dancers, the power that they have in their bodies, combined with the accuracy, is very attractive, people are drawn to it… and the relationship between the music and the movement works so well.”

Attractor’s popularity with both audiences and critics is due to its clarity of purpose, Obarzanek believes. “From a popular perspective, the dance is very connected to the music, and the music to the dance. That relationship is very straightforward… it’s not some kind of cryptic work,” he reflects. “And yet it is quite sophisticated… it pushes itself hard, physically and musically, and becomes quite impressive in that way.”

The dance is very connected to the music, and the music to the dance. That relationship is very straightforward… it’s not some kind of cryptic work. And yet it is quite sophisticated… it pushes itself hard, physically and musically.

The concept behind Attractor is about experiential art rather than aesthetics. “The performers are not creating beautiful shapes in space or aesthetic compositions,” explains Obarzanek. “They’re getting into a kind of movement pattern, which repeats and goes in circles. It draws the audience in rather than performing out to the audience. And then people begin to join that, from the audience.”

For Obarzanek, who spent his early childhood on a kibbutz in Israel, the motivation to make this kind of work came from a desire to return to his artistic roots in Israeli folk dance. “After many years of working with professional dancers and making highly virtuosic dance, I chose to go back to my early influences in dance. I wanted to make this work which was more like folk dancing and participating, and being in something rather than being outside and looking in,” he elaborates. “When [Lucy Guerin and I] listened to the music of Senyawa, which was very much influenced by trance rituals in Indonesia, this idea of submitting to some state of otherness by doing something over and over influenced us a great deal.”

Attractor
“Senyawa play live and they’re really charismatic, powerful performers. So really it’s also a music concert. And then the virtuosity of the Dancenorth dancers, the power that they have in their bodies, combined with the accuracy, is very attractive.” Photo: Gregory Lorenzutti.

And how did the group of artistic dynamos come together?

“The background is really quite simple,” replies Obarzanek. “Kyle Page had only been director of Dancenorth for a short while when he asked Lucy [Guerin] and I if we would each make a piece for Dancenorth. We suggested making a single work together. I had been working indirectly with Senyawa in Indonesia. They had taken me on a journey to see some traditional dance and music ritual in far-East Java. We had been discussing the idea of doing a contemporary, secular ritual based on these traditional forms that interested us.”

Obarzanek took this idea back to Guerin who was keen. “Then we proposed a larger work than the resources that Dancenorth had at the time, which was a limited number of dancers,” he continues. “So Lucy suggested a co-production with her company [Lucy Guerin Inc] and we supplemented Dancenorth’s cast with a few other dancers. So it’s a larger cast than Dancenorth would normally have.”

I usually hate audience participation and so does Lucy. We designed it from the perspective of people who don’t like audience participation.

While the ingredients were all there in terms of creative talent, there was something else at play when it came to making to work, says Obarzanek. “I find, with collaborations, that a lot of it is the people but a big part of it is luck as well. We happened to work well together. We had the right balance of respect and interrogation, and knowing when to work together, and when people needed to go off on their own trajectory and make things that were not collaborative to bring back as a proposal to add to the work.”

One of the more unusual aspects of Attractor is that, just over half way through the work, the dancers are joined on stage by 20 audience members. While the volunteers are not rehearsed in advance, arriving just an hour before the show to receive their instructions, this section took a lot of studio time to perfect, says Obarzanek. “We spent between and third and half of the creative development time working on that aspect of the show. During the show there are 10 professionals on stage and then, just after half way through, 20 audience members join the performance. They’ve never seen the show and they get directed by Amber Haines, via these inner ear monitors. It works really well now but it took a lot of test groups for us to get the right instructions to get the outcomes that worked for the participants and worked for the audience. So that was a big part of the development of the work.”

The feedback from participants has been extremely positive, says Obarzanek, perhaps because both Obarzanek and Guerin are not normally fans of audience participation. “I usually hate audience participation and so does Lucy,” says Obarzanek with a laugh. “We designed it from the perspective of people who don’t like audience participation. So I think we’ve made something… you never have to express yourself or ‘perform’. The instructions are very literal. They’re straightforward. They’re not hugely creative. The participants appreciate it. They don’t have to think of anything to do. Once you’re being guided along, you give over to that very quickly and easily. And it’s fun… and it’s busy. You’re so busy doing the show that I don’t know how much time you really have to reflect that you’re on stage with these dancers.”

Attractor plays the Heath Ledger Theatre, 8-10 February, as part of Perth Festival.

Pictured top: “The dancers are getting into a kind of movement pattern, which repeats and goes in circles. It draws the audience in rather than performing out to the audience.” Photo: Gus Kemp.

Vessel
Calendar, Dance, March 18, Performing arts

Perth Festival: Vessel

Dance ∙
Mar 1 – Mar 4 2018 @ Heath Ledger Theatre ∙
Presented by: Damien Jalet & Kohei Nawa ∙

Out of the darkness, a white organic structure looms above a pool of water. Seven near-naked bodies move on this floating stage, becoming one with the gases, liquids and solids that form all around them.

Celebrated Belgian choreographer Damien Jalet and Japanese sculptor Kohei Nawa have created an experience that is truly out of this world. On a set unlike anything seen before, bodies become sculpture as they pulsate to a haunting score by Marikho Hara with Ryuichi Sakamoto.

Part dance, part dream and complete poetry in motion, this visual and aural spectacle will stay with you long after you leave the theatre.

More info: https://www.perthfestival.com.au/event/vessel

Atractor
Calendar, Dance, February 18, Performing arts

Perth Festival: Attractor

Dance ∙
8-10 February @ The Heath Ledger Theatre ∙
Presented by: Lucy Guerin Inc/Gideon Obarzanek/Dancenorth/Senyawa ∙

Surrender yourself to a trance-noise odyssey as Indonesia’s tour-de-force music duo Senyawa and Melbourne choreographic luminaries Lucy Guerin and Gideon Obarzanek join forces with two of Australia’s leading dance companies.

Senyawa reinterprets the Javanese tradition of entering trance through dance and music as a powerful, contemporary ritual. As the performance unfolds, their unusual fusion of hand-made electrified stringed instruments with operatic melodies and heavy metal vocals slowly builds to a euphoric pitch while the dancers are propelled into ecstatic physical abandonment. The result is a visceral, empathic experience for the audience – and you can take it even further.

Each performance, 20 unrehearsed participants join the performers on stage dissolving the distinction between dancer and non-dancer, audience and performer in a cross-cultural, shared ritual.

More info: https://www.perthfestival.com.au/event/attractor

Farewell to Paper, Evgeny Grishkovets
Calendar, February 18, Performing arts, Theatre

Perth Festival: Farewell to Paper

Theatre ∙
16-18 February @ Heath Ledger Theatre ∙
Presented by: Evgeny Grishkovets ∙

Remember a life without smartphones or tablets? When mail meant a handwritten letter and you planned a trip with a map not an app? We’re saying goodbye to paper in our lives and it’s happening so fast we’re not stopping to think about its significance.

Enter Russian poet, playwright and theatre director Evgeny Grishkovets with his charming one-man show that gives paper, and everything it represents, a proper send off. Sitting at a desk surrounded by an old, ramshackle typewriter, books and stacks of paper Grishkovets delivers a passionate and hilarious monologue about the unavoidable disappearance of words such as ‘telegram’ or ‘manuscript’. He recalls childhood memories that would not have happened without ink stains or blotting paper and savours feelings that only come with handling a globe or glimpsing the recognisable handwriting of a loved one.

A tender tribute to once everyday things that are quickly becoming history, Farewell to Paper is a funny and poignant look at change in the digital age.

More info: https://www.perthfestival.com.au/event/farewell-to-paper

April 18, Calendar, Comedy, Performing arts

Comedy: Afternoons Tonight! with James Valentine

29 April, 5pm @ HEATH LEDGER THEATRE – STATE THEATRE CENTRE •
Presented by Live Ideas and Perth Comedy Festival

Live Ideas and Perth Comedy Festival present
Afternoons Tonight! with James Valentine
“Talk back radio. You won’t believe who calls ..…”
HEATH LEDGER THEATRE – STATE THEATRE CENTRE
SUNDAY, 29 APRIL AT 5.00 PM

Direct from sell out seasons on the East Coast, James Valentine tours his wildly funny stage show to Perth Comedy Festival.

James Valentine exists in the grey fringes of your memory. He did ABC TV kids telly in the 80s, he was in the hit Australian band Models, and he’s been on some shockers of TV shows that even he can’t remember.

But what he’s actually been up to for the last twenty years is talk radio on ABC Radio Sydney. He’s been on air for two decades and his Afternoons show is like no other. It’s funny, but not just because he’s funny – it’s his callers. They are hilarious. They’re bizarre, and they tell him all the weird stuff that happens in their life.

James will share his best, worst and most intriguing callers from his Afternoons radio show, and then he’ll turn it over to you for a live session of talkback theatre that will bring out the strange, the wonderful and the hilarious sitting right there in the room.

You’ll laugh, you’ll crack up and you’ll have something to talk about all weekend!

Afternoons Tonight! is a fantastically funny and interactive night at the theatre and a great insight into how talk radio really works!

James Valentine is one of Australia’s most loved radio presenters and in a long and eclectic career has worked as a journalist, author, television host and musician. A saxophonist, he has performed with many acclaimed acts including: Jo Jo Zep, Models and Absent Friends. James also hosts the ABC Podcast Head Room which expands on musings and questions posed during James’ Afternoons radio show from 1-3pm weekdays on ABC Radio Sydney and NSW.

Ticket Price- $49.50/ $45.00 Concession http://www.perthcomedyfestival.com or phone (08) 6212 9291
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Twitter: https://twitter.com/abcperth @abcperth
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More Info visit: www.abccommercial.com/events

Promo video: https://vimeo.com/246223053

More info: http://perthcomedyfestival.com
Email: info@perthcomedyfestival.com