Review

Trio play out of their skins

  • Reading time • 4 minutes
  • More like this

Review: University of Western Australia & Tura New Music, Armadillo ·
University of Western Australia, 16 July ·
Review by Jonathan W. Marshall ·

A percussion trio led by American Robyn Schulkowsky has performed one of the concerts of the year as part of the international Gender Diversity in Music and Art Conference at the University of West Australia.

The Australian premiere of Schulkowsky’s 30-year-old work Armadillo is the first of three evening performances over the four-day conference  this week, in addition to a wide range of academic discussions about historic female artists, contemporary queer music, and feminist sound art.

Two more concerts round out the conference performance program at the the UWA Conservatorium of Music, presented by UWA and Tura New Music. Decibel new music ensemble, led by Cat Hope, offers a survey of compositions by contemporary Australian female composers as part of its 10th anniversary (Decibel 10 at 10) on July 18. Queensland percussionist Vanessa Tomlinson closes the conference with a performance in the UWA Tropical Garden on July 19.

Schulkowsky is a veteran of the US and German experimental scene, having worked with Christian Wolff, Morton Feldman, and many others, principally in the role of performer/interpreter. In devising Armadillo, she was inspired partly by Mayan calendrical cycles and numerological groupings.

As performed by Schulkowsky with Tomlinson and UWA head of percussion Louise Devenish, Armadillo is a mercurial, endlessly surprising work. Small, semi-detached rhythmical items rest within other inconsistent, larger groupings, which intermittently break out, or cause the piece to morph in time signature and/or sonic texture.

Although peppered with extended, cumulative agitations of the cymbals and tam-tam (or gong), it is first and foremost a piece for drums. It is amazing the amount of sonic variation that Schulkowsky, especially, coaxes from these instruments as the piece develops in time.

There is a brief passage of Brazilian batucada-style drumming, with sharply-attacked bongos leading, but this is soon dispersed into a more effervescent set of motifs. Steve Reich’s highly repetitive, minimalist drumming is evoked when the three performers settle into a groove which feels like it could last all night. But on the whole, the shimmering effects and phasing so loved of Reich is absent here.

Armadillo is therefore more properly called a work which at times settles into a minimalistic lockstep, as rhythmic patterns are lovingly repeated. The highly asymmetric time signatures required Schulkowsky in particular to, very comfortably it seemed, pump out one rhythm with her foot on the cymbal hi-hat pedal, and an entirely different one with her sticks in her hands on the toms. This puts Armadillo ultimately within another musical and stylistic space to Reich or Latin percussion, although Schulkowsky is clearly influenced by both.

Another striking element of the performance is the rise and fall of intensity which is modulated through how the drums are approached. Schulkowsky and her collaborators however often combine a strike to the drum with a kind of dampening or pressing effect. When performing as a trilogy, the usual mode is to come together for several minutes, then one performer drops away, the others continue, and then the first returns before another drops out. In this turn taking, volume and textural density rise and fall. One needs a careful ear to attend to the very subtle layering of material.

Schulkowsky definitely loves her instruments. I have never seen a performer with such a deft touch on the skins of the drums. While Tomlinson and Devenish are also superb, Schulkowsky all but strokes her instruments. She bashes, coaxes, rubs, caresses and finger-thunks these items. As she rocks gently back and forth, or looks off in absorption upwards and to one side, we in the audience also move to another place with her; a place of objects, surfaces, drum-skins, and musical sublimity.

This was one of the most extravagantly wonderful and awe-inspiring Perth concerts of the last few years: please bring Schulkowsky back!

The Gender Diversity in Music and Art Conference ends on July 19.

Pictured at top: Vanessa Tomlinson, Robyn Schulkowsky and Louise Devenish. Photo by Tristen Parr.

Like
0
Love
0
Ah Ah
0
Wow
0
Sad
0
Grrr
0

Author —
Associate Editor

Past Articles

  • Portraits of place and ‘progress’

    Review: Tami Xiang, Esther McDowell/Yabini Kickett, Tom Freeman, Lisa Liebetrau, ‘August exhibitions’ · Cool Change Contemporary · Review by Stephen Bevis · The Bon Marché Arcade Building on…

    Like
    0
    Love
    0
    Ah Ah
    0
    Wow
    0
    Sad
    0
    Grrr
    0
  • A galaxy of ideas in sci-fi show

    Review: Erin Coates and Jack Sargeant, ‘Other Suns: Cult Sci-Fi Cinema and Art’  · Fremantle Arts Centre · Review by Miranda Johnson · Embracing the non-human, the historical, the…

    Like
    0
    Love
    0
    Ah Ah
    0
    Wow
    0
    Sad
    0
    Grrr
    0

Read Next

  • Review

    Christmas joy

    St George’s Cathedral Consort, ‘Bach’s Christmas Oratorio’ ·
    Perth Concert Hall, December 13 ·
    Review by Sandra Bowdler ·

    Like
    0
    Love
    0
    Ah Ah
    0
    Wow
    0
    Sad
    0
    Grrr
    0
    Reading time • 4 minutesMusic
  • Jenny Watson
Horse series painting no. 9: with yellow rug 1974
oil, synthetic polymer paint and lead pencil on canvas
177.4 x 243.9 cm
State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia
Purchased 1988
 Jenny Watson Horse series painting no. 9: with yellow rug 1974 oil, synthetic polymer paint and lead pencil on canvas 177.4 x 243.9 cm State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia Purchased 1988
    Review

    Partying with colour and nostalgia

    Robert Cook (curator), ‘Perth Brutal: Dreaming in Concrete’; ‘That Seventies Feeling … the Late Modern’ ·
    Art Gallery of WA ·
    Review by Craig McKeough ·

    Like
    1
    Love
    0
    Ah Ah
    0
    Wow
    0
    Sad
    0
    Grrr
    0
    Reading time • 6 minutesVisual Art
  • Photo: Bo Wong Tiny illuminated coffins containing elements of Martu culture
    Review

    An intimate glimpse into Martu culture

    Review: Curtis Taylor, ‘Untitled (Uura)’ · Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts · Review by Jess Boyce · Though Curtis Taylor is recognised as one of Australia’s…

    Like
    0
    Love
    0
    Ah Ah
    0
    Wow
    0
    Sad
    0
    Grrr
    0
    Reading time • 3 minutesVisual Art

What’s in a name?

Join the conversation

Meet the Seesaw team