20220325__WAMBB_VirtualRealms_DigitalAd_970x902.gif
Reviews/Circus/Fringe World Festival

Coolest cavemen

20 January 2020

The long-anticipated world premiere of the new children’s circus show by Head First Acrobats attracted capacity crowds over the weekend. Most of the audience were under the age of ten and laughed themselves silly…

Review: Head First Acrobats, PreHysterical ·
Woodside Pleasure Gardens, 29 January 2020 ·
Review by Rosalind Appleby ·

The long-anticipated world premiere of the new children’s circus show by Head First Acrobats attracted capacity crowds over the weekend. Most of the audience were under the age of ten and laughed themselves silly as three foolish Neanderthals bumbled their way (albeit with extreme athleticism!) around the stage.

PreHysterical lives up to expectations, following in the footsteps of the Melbourne group’s 2019 Fringe show Arrr We There Yet? with another perfect blend of comedy and spectacle.

The (very loose) plot revolves around the club-wielding cavemen as they navigate the perils of growling tigers and grumbling tummies. Somehow this story line is spun out for 45 minutes of crazy fun. Isaac Lawry is loveable as the dense Ow, Thomas Gorham is the athletic and reckless Err, and the smartest of them all is the drawing, hunting and hula hooping Rok (Chelsea Angell). They are the coolest cavemen a kid could hope for: eating snot and cracking fart jokes as they flip and break dance across the stage.

A few well designed props and clever lighting conjures up an animal boneyard, a tiger net, a campfire and a river of electric eels. Any excuse really for some trapezing, aerial silks and balancing.

The four kids with me gave five stars to the amazing hula hooping, the apple swapping foolery and the exciting story. I’m not sure what they meant about the exciting story (!) but the plot was made almost redundant anyway by the fabulous banter, pumping sound track and spectacular acrobatics. This is a show packed with stunts and although there were fumbles landing a few, it was a classy production. PreHysterical is the complete package.

PreHysterical continues until 9 February 2020. Head First Acrobats are also presenting the adult shows Railed and Circus’Cision.

Picture top: Isaac Lawry, Thomas Gorham and Chelsea Angell as the three lovable Neanderthals.

Like what you're reading? Support Seesaw.

Author —
Rosalind Appleby

Rosalind Appleby is an arts journalist, author and speaker. She is co-editor of Seesaw Magazine, author of Women of Note, and has written for The West Australian, The Guardian, The Australian, Limelight magazine and Opera magazine. She loves the percussion instruments which can be found in the uber cool parks.

Past Articles

  • Government reveals plan for Perth’s ‘beating cultural heart’

    The McGowan Government has announced extra funding for the Perth Cultural Centre redevelopment. But can infrastructure investment alone resuscitate an arts and culture sector still struggling with the challenges of COVID and ongoing budget cuts?

  • Composer looks to the past

    Composer Kate Milligan is diving back to the 16th century via an ancient shipwreck. The composer has received funding to unite old and new by bringing together electronic music and a flute that has spent 500 years underwater.

Read Next

  • MC_Freakley_For You, Danielle Freakley, detail: For You, 2019-2022. Volcanic rock, water clear polyurethane, ink. Dimensions variable. Danielle Freakley's 'For You' looks like a crashing wave made of glass. Danielle Freakley peels back the layers
    Reviews

    Danielle Freakley peels back the layers

    18 May 2022

    A local artist with an international reputation, Danielle Freakley seems driven by a desire to find out what we really want to say to each other. And ahead of her exhibition at Moore Contemporary, she tells Nina Levy what she really wants to say.

    Reading time • 10 minutesVisual Art
  • Reading time • 5 minutesMusic
  • Barney McAll WAAPA Jazz in the Theatre series. A bearded man at the piano looks toward fellow musicians who are playing a keyboard and harp. WAAPA serves up a slice of NYC jazz
    Reviews

    WAAPA serves up a slice of NYC jazz

    9 May 2022

    In a retrospective performance, jazz virtuoso Barney McAll draws on the traditions of his genre while pointing the way to the future, writes Garry Lee

    Reading time • 5 minutesMusic

Leave a comment

Cleaver Street Studio

Cleaver Street Studio

Cleaver Street Studio