Rocks
Calendar, Exhibitions, June 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: June Exhibitions at Cool Change

8 – 29 June @ Cool Change Contemporary ·
Presented by Cool Change Contemporary ·

Cool Change’s June Exhibitions include:
Gallery 1: ‘Drifting Proximities’ (Tessa Beale, Bina Butcher & Phoebe Clarke)
Gallery 2: ‘Deep Heritage’ (Cassie Lynch, Rebecca Orchard, Andrew James Williams, Mei Swan Lim)
Gallery 3: ‘Suburban Musings and Other Curious Finds’ (Pip Lewi)
Project Space: ‘Here, with a bang!’ (Lauren McCartney)

Opening Night: 7 June

More info
W: www.coolchange.net.au/exhibitions/
E:  hello@coolchange.net.au

Pictured:
Rebecca Orchard, Fragments of A Shifting Landscape, 2016. Image Courtesy of the Artist.

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Objects at Bedside
Calendar, Exhibitions, June 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: Bedside

7 – 20 June @ Spectrum Project Space, ECU, Mount Lawley ·
Presented by Lucille Martin ·

Bedside is a new exhibition by Australian contemporary artist, Lucille Martin. Martin is an artist working in photo-media, textile and performative practice exploring new frontiers of self-representation to navigate the intersections of art, science and technology.

Martin’s new exhibition, Bedside is an iPhoneographic multi-media installation exploring identity through Documentary participant observational image capture* of her bedside table taken on a daily basis over a three-year period. This multi-media exhibition is a story of female identity through love, loss, place and exploration.

Bedside is about reclaiming identity and how the camera phone becomes an intimate form of stability in that process. In 2017 Martin’s iPhoneography images and the journey she has recorded became the basis of a PhD (Provisional). Martin’s story is currently in production as a documentary work by a filmmaker in Melbourne and her immersive exhibition of images and video work opens at Spectrum Project Space on 6 June. The iPhone camera provides a freedom and accessibility to share in a collective cultural experience, engaging in new ways of working and seeing the world. The images share the intimate and common objects, patterns and repetitious positioning of the ordinary and extraordinary experiences of life toward an expression of universal emotion.

Lucille worked as a freelance artist for Vogue, Harpers, Belle, TV Soap, Penthouse and other fashion magazines during the 90’s. Trained as an Art director she went into professional art practice over 25 years ago. Throughout her awarded career Martin has frequently roamed within the world of documentation and candid display since she shot her first images during the Anti-apartheid riots in South Africa in 1984. It was the launch of her first exhibition, Blind Spots in 1986, in support of her passion for human rights at Sydney’s King Street Gallery and an Australia Council project grant following soon after, which established her award-winning work in Sydney and Perth. Martin’s long career includes significant community development and participation, higher education, pedagogy and policy advocacy.

For further information please contact Lucille on 0407842442

“The everyday and the ordinary are evocative and challenge my desire for self-protection and preservation.  Bedside is vulnerable, personal, universal, uncomfortable and mundane”, Lucille Martin.

An artist talk will take place with Lucille Martin on Thursday 6 June at 5.15pm to be followed by the Official Opening by Ms Geraldine Mellet from 6 – 8pm at Spectrum Project Space, ECU Mount Lawley Campus, Building 3, Room 3.191

Exhibition opening hours:
Tuesday to Friday 10.00am – 5.00pm; Saturday 12.00pm – 5.00pm

More info
W: www.facebook.com/events/462811711122695/
E:  spectrum@ecu.edu.au

Pictured: Bedside courtesy of Lucille Martin

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April 19, Calendar, Exhibitions, May 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: ‘Survival: Fight or Flight’ and ‘Altered States’

5 Apr – 19 May @ Mundaring Arts Centre ·
Presented by Mundaring Arts Centre ·

‘Survival: Fight or Flight’
Gallery 1
Six artists with connections to Midland TAFE’s former Environmental Art course explore the concept of Survival: Fight or Flight. Using a variety of mediums the artists delve into issues that question our existence in a world fraught with challenges. An exciting exhibition evoking a juxtaposition of responses by Denise Brown, Peter Dailey, Bev Iles, David Small, Cathy Swioklo and Patricia Tarrant.

‘Altered States’ | Karen Prakhoff Rickman
Gallery 2
In her depiction of landscape, Rickman exploits the potential for mark making and layering inherent in the monotype process. Each layer alters the previous state, simultaneously creating and denying form. Her ambiguous landscapes evoke personal and collective memory: faint, forgotten or altered recollections.

Opening Friday 5 April 7pm – 8:30pm
Exhibition continues 6 April – 19 May
Tuesday – Friday 10am – 5pm, Saturday & Sunday 11am – 3pm

More info
W: www.mundaringartscentre.com.au/
E:  info@mundaringartscentre.com.au

Pictured:
Images: Peter Dailey, ‘Survival I’ (detail), 2018, oil on board, 1220 x 720 mm and
Karen Prakhoff Rickman, ‘Altered states’ (detail), 2018, diptypch, monoprint – etching ink on rag paper, photograph by Eva Fernandez.

 

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Danjoo Interwoven
April 19, Calendar, Exhibitions, February 19, March 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: Danjoo – Interwoven

15 Feb – 6 Apr @ Midland Junction Arts Centre ·
Presented by Midland Junction Arts Centre ·

‘Danjoo – Interwoven’ celebrates local Aboriginal culture, Country, language and visual arts practice in Western Australia, proudly presenting new and recent artworks by eighteen Aboriginal artists from or now residing in the south west corner of the state. Danjoo – meaning together in Bibbulmun Noongar language reflects the bringing together of established, mid-career and emerging Aboriginal artists working in diverse art forms, presenting artworks that speak of local Aboriginal culture and contemporary, personal, social and political issues.

Curated by Wadandi/Minang/Koreng Bibbulmun artist Lea Taylor and Midland Junction Arts Centre Curator Greg Sikich, ‘Danjoo – Interwoven’ features the work of Deborah Bonar, Lance Chadd, Julie Dowling, Jeanette Garlett, Naomi Grant, Linda James, Bradley Kickett, Rohin Kickett, Norma MacDonald, Janine McAulley Bott, Esther McDowell, Lewis Nannup, Daniel Roe, Lea Taylor, Jo Ugle, Mandy White, Desmond Woodley and Boyden Woods.

Opening celebration Friday 15 February 6:00 pm- 8:30pm
Exhibition continues 16 February – 6 April

More info
W: www.midlandjunctionartscentre.com.au
E:  info@mundaringartscentre.com.au

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Life on a Muster
Calendar, Exhibitions, February 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: Desert River Sea Opening Cultural Celebration

9 February @ Art Gallery of WA ·
Presented by Art Gallery of WA ·

Desert River Sea: Portraits of the Kimberley is the highly anticipated culmination of the Art Gallery of WA’s six-year Kimberley visual arts project, supported by Rio Tinto. This landmark exhibition showcasing the vibrant and contemporary creative talent of Kimberley artists opens with a cultural celebration on 9 February 2019 from 10am to 5pm.

Join AGWA for an unmissable celebration of Kimberley art and culture with artist talks, art demonstrations, cultural performances and family activities. Learn about the art of pearl shell carving with the Sibosado brothers – Darrell and Garry, and bush-dying with natural materials with Eva and Ivy Nargoodah. Hear from Mowanjum Arts on ochre crushing and Wandjina Rock art education, or watch Mervyn Street of Mangkaja Arts carve and shave a cow hide. Waringarri Aboriginal Arts will demonstrate boab nut carving.

AGWA and art centre curators, along with artists will talk about their experiences across the day. Listen to live music by David Pigram and browse handmade items including carved pearl shells, dyed silks, textiles and jewellery at the AGWA Shop.

More info
W: www.artgallery.wa.gov.au/exhibitions/desert-river-sea-exhibition-experience.asp
E:  admin@artgallery.wa.gov.au

Pictured:
John (Johnny) Nargoodah Life on a muster 2018 (detail). Synthetic polymer and
leather ink on stamped cow hide, 92 x 199 cm. Courtesy Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency.

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children entering a room full of crotcheted reef and sea animals
Children, Exhibitions, News, Reviews, Visual arts

Amazing kids exhibition pitches it right first time

Review: ‘Animaze; Amazing Animals for Kids’ ⋅
Fremantle Arts Centre, November 24 ⋅
Review by Rosalind Appleby ⋅

Visiting the Fremantle Arts Centre’s latest exhibition was like touring Aladdin’s cave; room after room filled with artistic riches that the four children I had in tow wanted to admire, touch, and try. Fortunately that’s exactly what is intended with Animaze: Amazing Art for Kids. Fremantle Arts Centre’s first exhibition designed specifically for children features the work of 50 artists and much of the work is interactive. You can time your visit to coincide with a sculpture or crotchet classes, story time, stroller tour or artist in residence session. Entry is free and even better you can pause part way for lunch at the cafe or a run under the trees.

Ross Potter demonstrates his shading pencil. Photo Rosalind Appleby

We started in the gallery where Ross Potter was working on a life-sized drawing of Tricia the elephant from Perth Zoo. Potter patiently answered questions and demonstrated how he used his toolbox of pencils and electric erasers to shade the enormous elephant with photographic accuracy. Then we were distracted for a good twenty minutes by the immersive joy of a room full of crochet. The Golden Wattle Hookers (Jill and Holly O’Meehan) have constructed a reef structure from brightly coloured wool art that climbs up walls, hangs from the roof and creates snuggly nooks.  It was the ultimate in tactile, sensory art and for several in my entourage this was the highlight, a place where they could hide, rest, and marvel.

Further treasures were uncovered down a hallway (via a 2-channel soundscape of frog and bird calls) where a dark room offered monster animal portraits (Austen Mengler) , shadow puppet opportunities and – by chance – the opportunity to become a work of art. It was perhaps not part of the original intention but my children – encouraged by the spirit of participation the exhibition had generated – discovered they were also illuminated by the UV light in Anna Nazzari’s aquarium: “My shirt has become seaweed!” my five year old exulted.

There was so much to see and do: Joe Ong’s intricate 10 metre pen drawing of 460 animals caused us to pause in wonder; the animated numbat images scurrying across a wall invited whole-body participation and there was wallpaper to colour and pom-poms to stick on a giraffe.

And then there were the bean bags scattered everywhere to collapse in. It was during one such chill-stop that we noticed the Cicada series on a wall.  “I like Shaun Tan’s work,” the nine year old in our party recognised it with delight. “It’s unorthodox. He draws weird things that aren’t normal. They are grey and sad but there is always something bright in there that the story is about.”

Shadow puppets invite a spirit of participation. Photo Rosalind Appleby

It’s not hard to ignite the imagination of a child but they are also honest critics, not easily duped by adults dragging them through an ‘educational’ art experience. It is sheer delight when arts companies (as Fremantle Arts Centre have done) pitch it just right so that the children interact spontaneously. All four of my entourage voted Animaze a success. “I really like art,” said one. “I suck at it but I really like it and it was good to learn more”.

“The whole thing was important,” they concluded, “doing an exhibition for the first time ever just for kids.”

Animaze: Amazing Art for Kids continues until January 23. Visit the website for details of classes and artist in residence sessions.

Pictured top: Jill and Holly O’Meehan’s Neon Lagoon. Photo Rebecca Mansell.

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Arts Hum
Calendar, Creative, December 18, Exhibitions, November 18, Visual arts

Exhibitions: ArtsHum 2018

29 Nov – 6 Dec @ Edith Cowan University
Presented by School of Arts & Humanities ·

ECU’s annual graduate exhibition, ArtsHum 2018, will open on Thursday, 29 November at the Mount Lawley campus, showcasing the best of graduating student work from
The School of Arts and Humanities.

ArtsHum 2018 will feature a series of simultaneous displays from across the creative disciplines, celebrating the talent and vision of students who are on the cusp of entering their respective industries.

The exhibition not only allows for students to liaise with professionals in their industry, but also to celebrate the culmination of years of hard work with family, friends, arts and humanities professionals, and wider community.

Highlights include a live fashion show in The Edith Spiegeltent, visual art and photography in Spectrum Project Space, live and interactive broadcasts from the new Broadcasting Facilities, and the Alumni Walk of Fame, featuring SAH’s successful graduates from years past.

Via the various galleries, display spaces and walkways centred around the art studios at the heart of ECU’s Mount Lawley campus, attendees to the free event will experience an array of visual art, fashion, design, photography, film, animation, games, writing, advertising, broadcasting, and journalism.

Henry Boston, former Executive Director of the Chamber of Arts and Culture, WA, will officially open the exhibition alongside Professor Clive Barstow, Dean of Arts and Humanities, ECU. “These amazing graduates will make a major contribution  to improving the qualityof life for everyone. As we move into a more automated
and data driven future,creative graduates will offer a life balance that will  redefine what it means to be human”, says Professor Barstow.

The ArtsHum 2018 opening is a licenced event, with refreshments provided, commencing at 6pm.

After opening night, the ArtsHum exhibition will be open to the public from Friday, 30 November to Thursday, 6 December between 9 am and 4 pm, excluding the weekend.

Fashion’s Graduate Show, TACK, will open on Friday, 14 December and is a ticketed event at $20 via Sticky Tickets.

More info
W: http://www.ecu.edu.au/artshum-exhibition
E:  p.monger@ecu.edu.au

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Disrupted Festival of Ideas
Calendar, Exhibitions, Festivals, July 18, Lectures and Talks, Performing arts, Visual arts

Disrupted Festival of Ideas 2018

28 – 29 July 2018 @ the State Library of Western Australia ·
Presented by: The State Library of Western Australia ·

As we become more embedded in the 21st century, technology has begun to move faster than we can keep up with. Technological advancements created for the military and space exploration are now accessible to everyone and infiltrate our daily lives.

How do we navigate this ever-changing world? Have we forgotten ethics or are we now better human beings?
How does technology impact the way we communicate, form relationships or develop as a society?

The 2018 Disrupted Festival of Ideas considers technology in its different forms, from the simple to the complex, gathering experts from around the country to discuss the state of the world through panels, conversations and keynotes.

More info: https://disrupted.slwa.wa.gov.au/

Photo by Jessica Wyld

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Sewing Machine
August 18, Calendar, Exhibitions, July 18, June 18, Visual arts

Exhibition: Homespun: The Fabric of Family

30 June – 11 August 2018 @ Conference Room, Wanneroo Library and Cultural Centre, 3 Rocca Way, Wanneroo 6065 ·
Presented by Wanneroo Regional Museum ·

In a simpler time of self-sufficiency born of necessity, home and family formed the fabric of pastoral Wanneroo.

This history is celebrated in Homespun: The Fabric of Family, a new exhibition featuring favorite textiles and objects from the Wanneroo Regional Museum collection.

Homespun looks back at the family milestones and daily domestic life of times gone by, to recognize the lasting value of cloth and stitch.

Weaving in significant stories and objects from Wanneroo’s past, this exhibition takes you on a journey through the history of sewing.

From wedding dresses and christening gowns, to historical sewing machines and retro paper patterns, Homespun surveys the fascinating heritage of textiles within the once rural outpost of Wanneroo.

More info: www.wanneroo.wa.gov.au/historyheritageandarts
Email: museum@wanneroo.wa.gov.au

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