Man conducting orchestra
Calendar, June 19, Lectures and Talks, Music, Performing arts

Music: Discovery Concert: The Classical Symphony

28 & 29 June @ Perth Concert Hall ·
Presented by West Australian Symphony Orchestra ·

A new way to experience classical music.

This concert is the first in a series exploring the evolution of the core of the modern orchestra’s repertoire – the Symphony. Join Principal Conductor and presenter Asher Fisch as we go right back to where it all began, with the music of the “Father of the Symphony”, Joseph Haydn, and his illustrious successor, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Share Asher’s own insights into the music of the Classical Era and discover how its greatest masters paved the way for all symphonic music that followed.

The concert concludes with a complete performance of Beethoven’s spirited Fourth Symphony. His last “Classical” Symphony, the Fourth is Beethoven’s final glance back to the sophisticated elegance of Haydn and Mozart, before his very next Symphony ushered in the ambitions, drama and passions of the early Romantic Era.

More info
W:  www.waso.com.au/concerts-tickets/whats-on/concert/Discovery-Concert-The-Classical-Symphony
E: waso@waso.com.au

Pictured: Asher Fisch – Discovery Concert: The Classical Symphony

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Man, woman and little girl planting a tree
April 19, Calendar, Film, Lectures and Talks

Film: Talks: 2040 Q&As with filmmaker Damon Gameau

26 – 29 April @ Various Cinemas ·
Presented by Madman Entertainment ·

Award-winning director Damon Gameau (That Sugar Film) is back with “2040” – a documentary where he embarks on a journey to explore what the future could look like by the year 2040 if we simply embraced the best solutions already available to us to improve our planet and shifted them rapidly into the mainstream. This is the narrative the next generation needs to see, to aspire to, and to believe is possible.

Ahead of the official release of the film on 23 May, Damon Gameau will attend advance Q&A screenings across Perth at the end of April.

Friday 26 April – Luna Leederville & Palace Raine Square
Sunday 28 April – Luna on SX & Event Cinemas Innaloo
Monday 29 April – Reading Cinemas Mandurah

More info:
www.whatsyour2040.com

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Indigenous man with truck created out of cardboard
April 19, Calendar, Lectures and Talks, Visual arts

Visual Arts/Talks: Revealed: Artists in Conversation

12 April @ Fremantle Arts Centre ·
Presented by Fremantle Arts Centre ·

Revealed: Artists in Conversation offers a great opportunity to learn more about the fascinating and diverse projects happening at Aboriginal art centres throughout WA and across the national sector. Join us for a morning of insightful, intimate conversations.

Program:

Timo Hogan, Kumanara Stevens and Sophia Brown from Spinifex Arts Project in Tjuntjuntjara (Great Victoria Desert, WA) will speak about MILPA: Language, Driving & Art, an important interdisciplinary arts project focused on creating Pitjantjatjara language resources for Anangu drivers.

Perth Centre for Photography and GEE CONSULTANCY will present on their recent photographic development program EXPOSURE: New Voices in WA Photography.

Artist Yhonnie Scarce and curator Hannah Presley will share some of their recent projects, focusing on work theyare undertaking in remote communities.

Lavene McKenzie and Dave Laslett, photographic collaborators from South Australia, will share their experiences of the First Nations Photographic Mentoring program they have been offering in South Australia.

Artist and storyteller Mervyn Street from Mangkaja Arts will share his recent project Veins of the Country which explores the importance of water, and the deep connection people have to water in the Fitzroy Valley.

Revealed: Artists in Conversation runs from 10am to 12pm.

Revealed: Artists in Conversation will be hosted by Western Australian curator, producer and writer Glenn Iseger-Pilkington. Cultural associations: Wadjarri, Nhanda, Noongar, Dutch and Scottish.

*Note: program is subject to change

More info
W: www.fac.org.au/whats-on/post/revealed-artists-conversation/
E:  artscentre@fremantle.wa.gov.au

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2 women and 2 men with a backdrop of posters
April 19, Calendar, Lectures and Talks, Workshops

Talks & Workshops: Feminist Futures: Wikipedia Edit-a-thon & Panel Discussion

13 April @ Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery ·
Presented by UWA Cultural Precinct ·

Join us for ‘Feminist Futures: Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon & Panel Discussion’ for an afternoon of events exploring the overlap between feminism, art and archiving practices. The work of women, transgender and non-binary artists has been underrepresented within public art collections. While disrupting the white, cis-male art canon has been integral to the work of feminists for decades, what are some of the issues for those carrying on this work today?

PANEL DISCUSSION (1:00pm – 2:30pm)
Join a panel discussion featuring local artists and arts workers committed to questioning and challenging institutional collecting practices. Collectively, we will consider ways feminism might be used as a toolkit to strive for more meaningful collections.

Speakers:
Aisyah Sumito
Dunja Rmandic
Gemma Weston
Sharyn Egan
Moderated by Megan Hyde

ART+FEMINISIM WIKIPEDIA EDIT-A-THON (11:30am – 3:30pm)
Join us at any stage throughout the afternoon for a Wikipedia Edit-a-thon! While anyone can contribute content to the world’s largest encyclopaedia, only 9% of contributors identify as female and less than 1% as trans or non-binary. Help improve those statistics by learning how to create and edit Wikipedia content. Some resources will be available on artists from Western Australia.

More info
W: www.facebook.com/events/753843034999324/?active_tab=about
E:  lwag@uwa.edu.au

Pictured: Kelly Doley, Things Learnt About Feminism #1 – #95 (detail), ink on 220 gsm card, 52 x 60 cm (95 pieces), CCWA 956 © Courtesy of the artist.

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Lady in field with hose pipe truck in background
April 19, Calendar, Lectures and Talks, Visual arts

Visual Arts: Talks: Meet the Artists | ‘Survival: Fight or Flight’

7, 9 & 14 April @ Mundaring Arts Centre ·
Presented by Mundaring Arts Centre ·

As part of ‘Survival: Fight or Flight’ on display at Mundaring Arts Centre 6 April – 19 May, artists Peter Dailey, Bev Iles, Patricia Tarrant, David Small, Denise Brown and Cathy Swioklo will discuss their work in the exhibition over a series of three free events.

Peter Dailey and Bev Iles | Sunday 7 April 1pm – 2pm
Patricia Tarrant and David Small | Tuesday 9 April 11am – 12pm
Denise Brown and Cathy Swioklo | Sunday 14 April 1pm – 2pm

More info
W: www.mundaringartscentre.com.au/
E:  info@mundaringartscentre.com.au

Pictured: Cathy Swioklo, ‘Hypervigilance’, 2019, soft pastel

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Part of man
Calendar, Lectures and Talks, May 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: Artist’s Talk: Jacobus Capone

4 May @ Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery ·
Presented by Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery ·

In this talk, artist Jacobus Capone discusses his works in the Perth Festival exhibition Love, Displaced. Based in Perth, Western Australia, Jacobus Capone maintains a practice that incorporates performance, photography, video installation, painting and site-specific work. Characteristically evocative and poetic, his work frequently combines physically demanding durational performances with majestic, sublime landscapes.
In 2007, he traversed Australia by foot in order to pour water from the Indian Ocean into the Pacific.

His work has been shown in a range of solo and group exhibitions, most recently his solo exhibition Forgiving Night for Day, Perth Institute of Contemporary Art (2017), Primavera, Museum of Contemporary  Art, Sydney (2017) and NEW16, Australia Centre for Contemporary Art.

Saturday 4 May 2019, 2:00pm – 3:00pm

More info
W: https://www.lwag.uwa.edu.au/events
E:  lwag@uwa.edu.au

Pictured: Jacobus Capone, Volta (still, detail), 2016, 2-5 channel video, duration: 53 minutes. Courtesy of the Artist. Commissioned by the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art for NEW16.

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Lady at lectern addressing audience
April 19, Calendar, Lectures and Talks, March 19, May 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: Talks: Friday Talks at LWAG

22 March, 5 April & 10 May @ Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery ·
Presented by Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery ·

Join us at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery for a lunchtime discussion on the latest
exhibitions and events. Hear from curators, artists and experts as they share their insights with us.

Starcraft and Cosmic Music
Friday 22 March 2019, 1:00pm – 2:00pm

Medieval and early modern people were fascinated with the heavens. In an illustrated talk,  Emeritus Professor in English and Literary Studies at UWA, Andrew Lynch explores the nature of the early cosmos in religious, philosophical and scientific thought, and its influence on literature and the arts, with effects lasting until present day.

Free event. Register: https://lwag1908.eventbrite.com/?aff=seesaw

Video Art in the Expanded Field
Friday 5 April 2019, 1:00pm – 2:00pm

Join Dr Laetitia Wilson to hear about contemporary developments in video art. Dr Wilson has taught art history courses on topics such as the evaluation of contemporary video practices and has curated numerous significant exhibitions in Perth.

Free event. Register: https://lwag1909.eventbrite.com/?aff=seesaw

From Boxes to the Walls
Friday 10 May 2019, 1:00pm – 2:00pm

Learn more about the artworks featured in currently exhibition, Carrolup Revisted as Berndt Museum of Anthropology Collection Manager Natalie Hewlett shares details about what it takes to prepare artworks for an exhibition.

Free event. Register: https://lwag1915.eventbrite.com/?aff=seesaw

More info: lwag@uwa.edu.au

Pictured: Performer at Lit Live event held at LWAG. Credit: Kate Shelton

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Features, Lectures and Talks, Literature, News, Perth Festival

A writers festival for you

Running from 18-24 February, Perth Festival Writers Week is a feast for the mind, combining an immersive weekend of panel sessions at the University Club at UWA as well as a number of satellite events around Perth. This year marks William Yeoman’s second as Writers Week Curator and, with one successful event already under his belt, he’s excited for what he promises will be an even better program this February. Claire Trolio spoke to Yeoman to find out more.

William Yeoman
William Yeoman

William Yeoman works an eight day week.

Yes, you read that right.  Maintaining his full time job as Books Editor and Arts Writer at The West Australian, he also works two days a week in the Perth Festival offices and steals time early in the morning or in the evenings to make up an extra day. Fortunately, there is some overlap between his jobs, most notably the copious amount of reading required!

To get through those mountains of literature, Yeoman has perfected the art of skim reading. When he’s reading for work and it’s not a text he’d otherwise choose, he is able to familiarise himself with a book in about one hour.

But reading for enjoyment? That’s another story he says. I wonder if there is any time left in his schedule for a leisurely read? “I make time,” he stresses. “If you love the language [of a writer] you need to slow down.” At the moment, Yeoman is savouring Fiona Wright’s collection of essays “The World Was Whole”, ahead of her appearance in two sessions at Writers Week.

Curating Perth Festival Writers Week is a mammoth task and Yeoman doesn’t pretend otherwise. “Let’s be clear, this kind of writers festival is a major international festival. But once you get your head around all that, it’s fine,” he chuckles. To approach the task he starts with a rough idea of the themes he wants to explore and the kinds of authors he wants to invite. But, he stresses, “it’s also about being flexible enough to change your mind and being ready to accept those authors who are offered up to you, sometimes quite late in the piece.”

Jane Caro. Photo: David Hahn.

Jane Caro is one example. The writer and social commentator’s new book Accidental Feminists, is coming out this month and Yeoman jumped at the chance to add her name to the bill. Not only does this make for an up-to-date, relevant program, but Caro is also a big name. “Someone like that is going to raise the profile of the festival,” explains Yeoman.

Entertaining the audience is also high on Yeoman’s list of priorities. “I am big on the ideas of performance and theatre,” he reflects. “Of course, solid, conceptual ideas might be at the heart of that, but hopefully they are presented in an engaging way. Part of creating that experience is related to the kind of guests you invite,” he continues, naming Benjamin Law and Mikey Robins as two 2019 Writers Week guests whose brilliant presentation styles were a big drawcard when planning the program.

As Writers Week Curator, Yeoman considers his responsibility to be “first and foremost, to the reader”. It’s the same way he approaches journalism. This means he must compromise his personal interests and, sometimes his political opinions. “It’s important to have dissenting voices [within a festival], not if they are extreme, but where they are reasonable,” he remarks.

There’s also room in the festival to have some fun, and one of the program highlights for Yeoman himself is Freo Groove, a celebration of the musical history of Fremantle. “To have writers and musicians Claire Moodie and Bill Lawrie together with Lucky Oceans and some of the musicians who feature in their book, in a free, outdoor marquee sundowner – what’s not to like?”

A keen musician himself, he admits to always seeking out musical connections, and the program reflects this. As well as Freo Groove, Yeoman has programmed author and travel editor Stephen Scourfield in conversation with Margaret River based guitar maker Scott Wise (There Are Strings Attached); Jazz High Tea, combining a conversation about The Great Gatsby with live music from WA Youth Jazz Orchestra; and a performance of songs of love and desire in German and English preceding a discussion about singing in translation (Lust in Translation).

The intersection between literature and other disciplines is a feature of Yeoman’s programming. Film, architecture, photography and fashion, as well as music, are represented in this year’s program. Where do you draw the line when it comes to crossing disciplines at a writers festival? “You don’t!” Yeoman responds emphatically. “You find a connection somewhere. If someone has written a book on a topic, well, it’s as easy as that.”

The architectural legacy of Kerry Hill will be discussed by Kerry Hill Architects’ Patrick Kosky and architect Geoffrey London alongside a tour of Hill’s City of Perth Library (Remembering Kerry Hill). And one of Australia’s most famous and respected film critics, David Stratton, will pop by. He’ll discuss hidden cinematic gems (101 Marvellous Movies You May Have Missed) before joining Jane Lydon, Joanna Sassoon and George Kouvaros to consider how moving and still images shape our memories and future (Migration, Memory & Movies).

Benjamin Law

Yeoman is also excited to present madison moore, an American cultural critic, DJ and Assistant Professor of Queer Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. Moore’s first book, Fabulous: The Rise of the Beautiful Eccentric, explores how eccentric style, fashion and creativity is political, particularly in queer culture and non-white cultures. As well as appearing alongside Benjamin Law and Ursula Martinez in panel session A Queer World, moore will present a late-night performance lecture at the State Theatre Centre of WA, exploring the concept of clubs as a safe space for experimentation and self-expression (Dance Mania: A Manifesto for Queer Nightlife).

Evidently, moore’s work ties in closely to what Yeoman has declared to be the theme of Writers Week 2019: Our Imagined Selves. “In fact,” declares Yeoman, “this year’s theme was partly inspired by madison moore.” As beautifully diverse as Yeoman’s 2019 Writers Week program is, this concept ties it together. Stories – both fiction and non-fiction – are the essence of who we are. So as you journey through Perth Festival Writers Week, consider yourself, your own story and how it fits with those around you. Because as much as the festival is about the writers, it’s also about you.

Perth Festival Writers Week runs from 18-24 February 2019. 

Pictured top is madison moore.

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In the middle of a crowd sits a horn player in a wheel chair, behind him stands a clarinet player and two dancers are linking arms
Dance, Features, Lectures and Talks, Music, News, Performing arts, Perth Festival

Disabling the boundaries

English conductor Charles Hazlewood will be in Perth in February with the British Paraorchestra. He talks with Rosalind Appleby about disabilities, the haptic baton and disrupting classical music.

When was the last time you saw a stage with disability access? Or a professional orchestra that included musicians with disabilities? In 25 years of conducting the world’s top orchestras, English conductor Charles Hazlewood had seen neither.

“If music is the great universal language how can it be that an orchestra – which is the beautiful large evidence of that – how can it be it doesn’t have people of disability in it? It’s a no brainer,” says Hazlewood.

We are talking over the phone ahead of Hazlewood’s visit to Perth with the British Paraorchestra as part of the Perth Festival. In 2010, inspired by his daughter who has cerebral palsy, Hazlewood founded the world’s first large-scale professional ensemble for virtuoso musicians with disabilities. The British Paraorchestra made their debut at the closing ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics.

“Most people don’t put disability and musical excellence in the same sentence,” Hazlewood says. “We need to take the same seismic leap in music that has happened in world class sport. Look at what the Paralympics has achieved.”

Conductor Charles Hazlewood. Photo Paul Blakemore

But Hazlewood’s dream is not just to provide musicians with disabilities the opportunity to play in orchestras. He wants to disrupt the barriers around our experiences of traditional orchestral music.

Hazlewood and the Paraorchestra are bringing to Perth their adventurous dance and music theatre work The Nature of Why. The immersive all-age experience involves four dancers and the Paraorchestra musicians supplemented by the string players of the Perth Symphony Orchestra. The work was created in 2018 in collaboration with Australian choreographer Caroline Bowditch with music composed by keyboardist Will Gregory from the electro-pop duo Goldfrapp. Their inspiration came from the Novel prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman and audio excerpts from his lecture Why underpin the work. The Nature of Why erases the boundaries between audience, music and movement with musicians and dancers performing in and around the audience.

“I wanted to create one space where the performers and the audience are immersed in the piece,” Hazlewood explains. “We are putting everyone in a glorious pit together, with sound bombarding you at every side. It is a deeply exciting environment to be in.”

It was exactly this kind of immersive experience that first inspired Hazlewood to pursue a life in music. “When I was seven I was a choir boy watching an orchestra rehearse in Cheltenham town hall. The conductor said ‘You look lonely, come and sit with us’. I sat in the middle of the orchestra and there were sounds fired at me from all directions. At that moment my life shifted in its axis. It was a tremendous and addictive moment to understand and experience this large team working in an astoundingly evolved way, working together but with each individual having freedom and flexibility.”

Performers and audience mingle in The Nature of Why. Photo Paul Blakemore

The blurring of genres and boundaries in The Nature of Why reflects the British Paraorchestra’s goal to re-invent the orchestra for the 21st century.

“The orchestra is the guardian of a great and noble tradition; Mozart, Brahms and Beethoven are our birthright on this planet. But as an artform it has stood still for a long time. It still has the same instrumental make up of a century ago which is incredibly unadventurous especially in the light of the new musical worlds we’ve uncovered through technology.”

The makeup of the Paraorchestra includes a Baroque lute, a Celtic harp, lap steel guitar and conventional instruments. The performers are people with hearing impairment, spina bifida, cerebral palsy and other disabilities, often using technology assisted devices to enable them to play their instruments. Hazlewood says the recent invention of the Haptic Baton means for the first time in history vision impaired musicians will soon be able to perform in an orchestra. Wireless transmissions from the conductor’s baton will transmit to a radio pack worn by the performer and the buzzes on their body will indicate the beat plus the space between the beat, enabling the performer to follow the ebb and flow of the music.

Hazlewood’s dream of a level playing field is one step closer.

“One day it will not be surprising for world class orchestras to include people of disability. These are musicians who play brilliantly, at the top of their game. It is the most thrilling journey.”

Charles Hazlewood will present a keynote address Building an Orchestra for the 21st Century on 18 February. The Nature of Why runs 21-23 February at the Heath Ledger theatre.

Pictured top: performers from UK performance of The Nature of Why. Photo Paul Blakemore

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Lydia Edwards
Calendar, Lectures and Talks, November 18

Lectures & Talks: Festive Fashion: A History of Christmas Clothing

25 November @ The Grove Community Centre ·
Presented by Lydia Edwards ·

Have you ever wondered why red and green scream ‘festive’, or how the Christmas-mad Victorians dressed for the season? What about the origin of the infamous Christmas sweater?

This illustrated talk, which will include examples of original antique garments, considers the role that Christmas has played in fashion past and present.

Fashion historian Dr Lydia Edwards, author of How to Read a Dress (2017) and headline speaker at this year’s Perth Writer’s Festival, will delve into hundreds of years of sartorial history to uncover why and how Christmas remains such a prominent inspiration, and beyond this, how fashion has embraced ‘the holiday season’ from the nineteenth century onwards.

Light refreshments including mince pies will be provided.

Sunday 25 November at 1.30 pm at the Grove Community Centre, 1 Leake Street, Peppermint Grove.

More info:
W:  www.ticketebo.com.au/the-grove-community-centre/festive-fashions-a-history-of-christmas-clothing.html
E:  ljedwardsauthor@gmail.com

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