Man from rear
Calendar, October 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: Where Things Commence

1 – 6 October @ Spectrum Project Space, Edith Cowan University, Mount Lawley ·
Presented by Gale Thackeray ·

Where things commence, Triggering ideas through the archive is a new exhibition by contemporary painter and current PhD candidate, Gale Thackeray. The archive is defined by Derrida as a place where things commence. Within her painting practice, the archive has emerged as not only a valid mode of artistic production but an unexpected methodology in the sense that the very acts of gathering and archiving can have a dynamic and direct influence in the creation of an artwork. The construction and development of the archive function as the trigger of ideas and therefore the place where things commence.

This methodology delivers a possible critical pathway in understanding the oeuvre of the painters known as the New Leipzig School who emerged out of the former German Democratic Republic after the fall of the Berlin Wall and who are the focus of Gale’s doctoral research.

Opening: Friday 4 October at 6pm by Dr Paul Uhlmann
Artists in Conversation, Gale Thakeray & Laura Mitchell, Sunday 6th October, 11am. Facilitated by Dr Lyndall Adams.

More info
W: www.facebook.com/events/425996781348523/
E:  spectrum@ecu.edu.au

Pictured: Hybrid No. 3, Gale Thackeray, 2019, oil on linen, 200 x 160 cm. Photograph courtesy of the artist.

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Calendar, October 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: Retro Stasia epidemic of nostalgia frenzy of progress

1 – 6 October @ Spectrum Project Space, Edith Cowan University, Mount Lawley ·
Presented by Laura Mitchell ·

Retro Stasia presents an interim view into Mitchell’s practice-led PhD research in the field of expanded painting as a contemporary method to critique and comprehend post-internet consumerism; its impact on place, space and collective memory. For this exhibition Mitchell develops a series of paintings focusing on the notion of mashup as method – a creation using material from two or more disparate sources. The term mashup is also used to describe Mitchell’s current praxis, which is located within the white cube of the gallery, the street, and between digital and tactile media.

Opening: Friday 4 October at 6pm by Dr Paul Uhlmann

Artists in Conversation, Laura Mitchell & Gale Thackeray, Sunday 6 October 11am. Facilitated by Dr Lyndall Adams

More info
W: www.facebook.com/events/898444677204091/
E:  spectrum@ecu.edu.au

Pictured: Deli-Glitch, Solid Life-Liquid Life, Laura Mitchell, 2019, graphite on rice paper, aerosol on rendered wall, digital collage. Photograph courtesy of the artist.

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Abstract in shades of terracotta
Calendar, November 19, October 19, September 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: Fremantle Arts Centre Print Award

19 Sep – 10 Nov @ Fremantle Arts Centre ·
Presented by Fremantle Arts Centre ·

Now in its 44th year, the Fremantle Arts Centre Print Award returns with a spectacular new showcase of prints and artists’ books from a selection of established, emerging and cross-disciplinary artists from across the country. In 2019, Australia’s premier printmaking prize continues to present works which celebrate traditional printmaking alongside those which look towards the future of the medium.

Join us at the exhibition opening, Thursday 19 September from 6.30pm to 9pm for the announcement of the 2019 winners and to view all of the finalists’ works.

More info
W: www.fac.org.au
E:  artscentre@fremantle.wa.gov.au

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Makaela Rowe-Fox. Photo: Kikei [dot] net.
News, Performing arts, Visual arts

Mobilising artists for climate action

The School Strike for Climate movement, spear-headed by teenage activist Greta Thunberg, has mobilised school students around the world. This Friday – 2o September 2019 – the students are inviting adults to join the movement in a global strike to demand climate action.

Makaela Rowe-Fox (16) is one of the organisers of the School Strike for Climate movement in Perth, and a performer with Co3 Youth and Yirra Yaakin Theatre Company. The young activist/artist has joined forces with her father Sam Fox (a Perth-based director, writer, choreographer and producer, and long time activist) and a committee of WA artists and arts workers, to form Arts and Cultural Workers for Climate Action (WA). Ahead of Friday’s Global Strike for Climate, Nina Levy caught up with Makaela and Sam to find out more.

Nina Levy: Makaela, tell me about the School Strike for Climate movement, and your involvement in the cause…
Makaela Rowe-Fox: So, the School Strike for Climate Movement began last year when Greta Thunberg, a Swedish teenager, began to strike outside her local parliament every friday. From there, many people were inspired by Greta’s actions and the school strike movement began.

Over the last year, the School Strike movement has exploded. Currently, over one hundred countries have students striking for climate action in over one thousand locations. With students not having the ability to vote we often feel that we have no voice; we strike to tell the world that we are taking action on climate change. Striking is direct action and has been proven throughout history to be one of the most effective ways of making change.

There are key mass mobilisations organised within the School Strike movement, one being March 15 earlier this year. I was an organiser for March 15, which saw 1.5 million students and supporters strike for climate action. I joined the movement through a family friend of mine who thought I might be interested. We organise almost solely online and I joined the national organising database through my family friend.

NL: What do you feel the School Strike movement has achieved to date?
MRF: I believe the School Strike movement has achieved world wide recognition on the reality of the climate emergency. We have created the sense of urgency that is necessary to make change. Our actions have led hundreds of governing bodies to start declaring that we are in a climate emergency, that can be seen in the 990 jurisdictions found in 18 countries across the globe. In the coming weeks, the United Nations will be hosting a climate change summit, which is the direct result of the School Strike movement demanding action.

I think you can also see that we have begun to shift societal understandings of what is possible. My generation realises that we have to take serious action if we want a future on this planet and that is resonating with many older generations. I feel that we will have shifted the mentality from “what can we achievably do about climate change” to “we will do what it takes as we take action on climate change”.

NL: Now the young strikers are calling on adults to join the movement in the Global Climate Strike, Friday 20 September. Tell us more about this strike. 
MRF: On September 20 there will the Global Climate Strike. In Perth it will start at Forrest Place at 11am. From there we’ll march through the city but we’re hoping it’ll be the biggest strike action in the history of this city (and the world) so it’s hard to say what it’ll be like. It’s not just a protest. It needs to be a big stop-work, a moment where the people of Perth take a big step in activating change. We’re working towards a general strike. In history general strikes brought about the 38 hour working week and led to revolutions. This strike won’t be the end point but it’ll be a huge step.

NL: And why is the Global Climate Strike so important?
MRF: Because we can’t address climate change while we’re stuck in a system that is built around destroying the planet. The Global Climate Strike is a way to halt this system and change direction. And if we don’t act immediately, we will face a chain of mass extinction events. It’s about survival and it’s about our responsibility to each other and the land.

Sam Fox addressing the audience at the Arts and Cultural Workers for Climate Action (WA) sector meeting in August 2019. Photo: Steven Alyian.

NL: Sam, you’ve been an activist for many years. Tell me about this latest chapter, the evolution of Arts and Cultural Workers for Climate Action (WA)… 
Sam Fox: Yeah, for a long time I’ve tried to find the balance between making art that is politically engaged and directly participating in activist campaigns. And I think this dilemma of doing our jobs versus taking actions as citizens is something we’re all trying to figure out now. My activism has gone up and down over the years but when Makaela got involved in organising the School Strikes I was blown away by how sophisticated and articulate their campaign platform was and, as a parent, I had to try to match my daughter’s commitment.

Arts and Cultural Workers for Climate Action came about through a small group of us getting together who wanted to answer the call of the Student Strikers for September 20. I think it’s been clear to many people for a long time that governments won’t take action on climate change but we haven’t had a vehicle that’s struck across society and the world until now. The young people can feel that we’re out of time and they’re showing us how to take action.

Our small group — starting with Aimee Smith, Deb Robertson, Petros Vouris, Janet Carter, Sue-Lyn Aldrian-Moyle and Noemie Huttner-Koros — recognised that the call for a Global Climate Strike could be the vehicle that changes our course and shifts power back to everyday working people. For us, that’s artists and cultural workers. So we decided to build an open platform for arts and cultural workers to call their own climate emergency and to get on board with the Global Climate Strike. We got some great help from Paper Mountain and PICA and organised a large sector meeting that was attended by 80 people and we built a platform from there. Janet Carter has initiated a whole lot of strike preparation workshops and we’ve all done a lot of communicating and promotion. As well as social media campaigns, we’ve got a list of public signatories that is growing every day.

Our list of artists is in the hundreds and features people of all creative disciplines. Our organisations now include: Spare Parts Puppet Theatre, Artsource, Art on the Move, Community Arts Network WA, pvi collective, Cool Change Contemporary, Circus WA, Mundaring Arts Centre, Midland Junction Arts, Propel Youth Arts, the Blue Room, West Australian Music (WAM), the Last Great Hunt, RTR FM and this great space, Seesaw Magazine.

RTR has been a particularly incredible advocate. They have organised community service announcements featuring student strikers and are going to get the students to co-host breakfast in the week of the strike. They’ll also be closing down for part of the day and broadcasting from the strike. We’ve got bands, collectives, indie groups, festivals.

Our sector is drawing a line in the sand for ourselves and as part of the broader movement. We’re mobilising from the grass roots up. We’ve never had such an overwhelming impetus for change and we don’t know what’s possible.

NL: What role can artists and companies play in the fight for action on climate change? 
SF: The great thing about our sector is we really have broad consensus among us that we need to call a climate emergency and that culture is tied to both people and the land. The broad values of our sector align with the climate strike movement and a transfer of power back to everyday working people. We have a big opportunity to lead by example as a sector and take action. However, I think the challenge for our sector is recognising that we can’t just do our jobs and expect change to happen. Essentially, we have to play our role just like any other sectors of society because we’re all in this situation together. The young people are saying that there’s no point to education on a dead planet. The same can be said for art as well as health care or science or any other vital industry. Just doing our jobs is not taking responsibility for change because our jobs don’t challenge the current system of flagrant ecological destruction for profit. It seems pretty clear after 50 years that transnational capitalism can absorb all the science and art we can throw at it.

If we can show out at the Global Climate Strike we’ll make a major impact. We’re already being used by the Student Strikers as an example of how industries can self organise and take political power back from those to whom we’ve delegated it. And we’re getting inquiries from national organisations and festivals on the east coast about what we’re doing.

The Arts and Cultural Workers for Climate Action (WA). Phot0: Steven Alyian.
The Arts and Cultural Workers for Climate Action (WA)’s sector meeting last month. Photo: Steven Alyian.

And how can audiences support artists and companies who take action?
That’s an interesting question. There are audience groups independent of our movement that are calling on arts organisations to disassociate from fossil fuel sponsors. This is something we have to negotiate and take seriously. I don’t think arts should have to lead the way when the rest of society is still addicted to petroleum, gas and air travel, but that’s what’s so important about the Global Climate Strike. It is calling for a just transition for workers and communities that are currently tied to unsustainable industries. That’s a good chunk of the arts as well as your miners. Just as it would be totally unfair and unethical to ask a miner just to quit their job with no other means of support, I think it is it unfair to expect a small-to-medium sized performance company to just turn off sponsorship that provides for people’s lives. We need to be part of a whole of society solution and the Global Climate Strike can be a key vehicle. The break from fossil fuel needs to be a negotiation that we all get involved in.

But, personally, I think there’s something about not being so clearly audience and presenter anymore. Maybe the challenge for all of us is to stop playing audience to our political power. I’m doing some research at the moment about the origins of theatre in Greece and the parallel rise of democracy. My very broad and nascent historical thesis is that, prior to professionalised theatre, theatre and dance were rituals that everyone could partake in it. Similarly, prior to elected representatives, power was localised; communal, village orientated, tribal etc. My working concept is that this professionalisation process of politics and culture was actually a terrible thing for society, not the foundation of civilisation that we think it is. In the contemporary world, a lot of people are beginning to question if elected representation like we have today, i.e. one person for every 150,000 in Australia, is anything but a conceit of democracy. Perhaps we’ve never tasted democratic power and the closest thing to a democratic assembly has been participatory theatre, dance and art. And grassroots political movements like strikes. Please note, these thoughts do not represent our group, just me musing in response to your question. We are a broad alliance and so I can’t speak for others beyond our commitment to our declaration of a climate emergency and committing to the Global Climate Strike.

NL: What are the different ways to be involved in the Global Climate Strike on Friday 20 September?
SF: First and foremost is we all need to stop work, turn up and enlist as many people as possible. If you’re an arts or cultural worker, you can use our platform to spread the word by sending on our open letters to peers and organisations, using our social media material (including a pretty fun and fruity profile frame) and being part of our contingent. We’re meeting outside PICA before the strike from 10:15am and we’ll walk over en masse.

Groups are putting out public statements declaring their own climate emergency and they’re asking their respective unions, councils and associations to go on strike. I know people are going to be using auto-responders so that their emails bounce back with a message about the strike. In Sydney there’s a Sound Strike movement for musicians — I’m not sure exactly what that’s going to look/sound like.

A number of arts organisations and groups are hosting placard and banner making workshops and this is a great way to broaden our alliances.

There’s no limit to what can be done. The main thing I suppose is to participate as collectively as possible. We have no power as individuals but this will be the biggest global movement in human history…

NL: What’s next, after the Global Climate Strike?
SF: After the strike, the next big challenge will inevitably be to figure out a way to deal with our reliance on fossil fuel sponsorship as a sector. But as I said before, we can’t do this alone. The call of the Global Climate Strike for a just transition to renewable jobs for workers and communities involved in non-renewable industries is so important. Once we’re done with the strike, I expect that our group will try to find a way to facilitate grass roots discussion about this. Hopefully, we’ll be beginning to transition alongside other industries.

For more information about Arts and Cultural Workers for Climate Action (WA), head to https://www.facebook.com/ArtsandCulturalWorkersWA/

Sign the Arts and Cultural Workers for Climate Action WA’s climate emergency declaration at http://bit.ly/sign-on-artstrikewa

Pictured top is Makaela Rowe-Fox at the School Strike for Climate (Boorloo/Perth): 15 March 2019. Photo: KIKEI [DOT] NET PHOTOGRAPHY.

Sam Fox
Sam Fox is a director, writer, choreographer and producer working across contemporary performance, literary fiction and community based collaborations.

Sam is currently working as: a creative Ph.D. candidate at the University of Western Australia where he is writing a novel that explores unorthodox unions and acts of auto-ideology; artistic director of DADAA’s “Experience Collider” project bringing young people with high support needs together with their peers in a performance project premiering at the State Theatre Centre in October 2019; and as an independent producer with robotic sculpture artists ololo, and with choreographer Rachel Arianne Ogle.

As director of interdisciplinary company Hydra Poesis, his performance and media works have been presented in a wide range of national and international contexts. Sam is an alumnus of the Sidney Myer Creative Fellowship program, a former artistic director of STEPS Youth Dance Company, a former associate producer of ARTRAGE, and has served as a panellist with the Department of Culture and the Arts, the Australia Council for the Arts, Committee for Perth, and as a board member of Contact Inc (Qld) and Hold Your Horses (WA).

Makaela Rowe-Fox
Makaela is sixteen years old and is one of the organisers for the school strike for climate movement in Perth. She decided to join the movement because she believes we need to take action on the climate crisis and can’t leave it to governments and corporations. As an organiser she has been involved in national calls, outreach to groups, unions and schools, managing social media, and has spoken/chanted/occupied at the major March 15 and May 3 strikes earlier this year. Makaela is also a performer with Co3 dance and Yirra Yaakin Theatre Company.

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Abstract of shapes in bright colours
Calendar, December 19, February 2020, January 2020, March 2020, Visual arts

Visual Arts: That Seventies Feeling…the Late Modern

7 Dec – 9 Mar @ Art Gallery of WA ·
Presented by Art Gallery of WA ·

AGWA 40 – Celebrating the anniversary of AGWA’s 1979 Brutalist building.

That Seventies Feeling…the Late Modern showcases some of the Gallery’s best works from the decade that saw the opening of AGWA’s much longed-for new Gallery. This show demonstrates a hidden richness and complexity to how we think of the seventies, while also reflecting the building’s own place in the story of modernism, as a regional example of a late Brutalism that itself foregrounds materiality and the experience of place, light and landscape.

Full of surprises and rarely seen works, That Seventies Feeling…the Late Modern examines a transformative decade for Western Australia, the Gallery and the world at large.

Featuring artists Miriam Stannage, Virginia Cuppaidge, Mike Parr and Brian Blanchflower, hip new visions by Robert Rooney, Stephen Shore and Jenny Watson, and late work by modernists Howard Hodgkin, Fred Williams and Albert Tucker you’ll be transported back to the decade that shaped modern Australia.

More info
W: artgallery.wa.gov.au/whats-on/exhibitions/seventies-feelingthe-late-modern
E:  admin@artgallery.wa.gov.au

Pictured: David Aspden Brazil Series No 5 1971 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 165 x 445 cm  State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia Purchased 1977 © David Aspden 1971

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News, Reviews, Visual arts

A rich tapestry of life and death

Review: Deborah Worthy-Collins, ‘Bone of my Bone, Flesh of my Flesh’ ·
The Lobby ·
Review by Jaimi Wright ·

“Bone of my Bone, Flesh of my Flesh” is, without a doubt, alive.

To look at Deborah Worthy-Collins’ body of work, inspired by her own life, is to have the collection look straight back into you and ask all manner of questions about birth, life, sex, death, decay, healing and the messy matrices and rituals in between. The Perth-based artist’s works incite a personal and yet broadly existential journey, one for which the opening night viewers, myself included, were not entirely prepared.

Bed sheets have been buried, exhumed, infused with live cultures, riddled with sewing, burned, turned into paper and hung on the walls of The Lobby like tapestries.
Bed sheets have been buried, exhumed, infused with live cultures, riddled with sewing, burned, turned into paper and hung on the walls of The Lobby like tapestries.

The journey of “Bone of my Bone, Flesh of my Flesh” is written in the journey of Worthy-Collins’ materials. Each material, carefully selected to reflect the emotional resonance of the human life-cycle, is deconstructed, reconstructed and caught in-between in order to explore a breadth of symbolic meaning. Bed sheets have been buried, exhumed, infused with live cultures, riddled with sewing, burned, turned into paper and hung on the walls of The Lobby like tapestries. Bed sheets, she says, are the site of many of life’s processes: sex, birth, death and often healing. By processing materials such as bed sheets, sand and muslin in a way that reflects life’s processes, Worthy-Collins unlocks the artistic potential of these processes.

Worthy-Collins must also be applauded for her resonant choice of exhibition venue. Not just a professional exhibition space, The Lobby doubles as a domestic abode, home of local curator and gallery manager Leah Robbie. The exhibition weaves about The Lobby, between bedroom and living area. Muslin, a material that has been used both to swaddle babies upon their birth and corpses upon their death, trails from the top to the bottom of the stairs of the house. To stage this exhibition within the traditional setting of a white cube would not do the complex themes Worthy-Collins explores justice; the use of a home gallery like The Lobby enhances the show’s emotional impact.

Using a deep red resin against reconstituted bed sheets, Worthy-Collins creates works that resemble leathery skin between decay and healing, that are crusted over like a scab but also glisten like jewels.
Deep red resin against reconstituted bed sheets, resembles leathery skin between decay and healing..

This exhibition is a timely reminder that the processes of life are not completely sanitary or entirely unpalatable, but like Worthy-Collins’ works, have varied physical and emotional textures. Using a deep red resin against reconstituted bed sheets, Worthy-Collins creates works that resemble leathery skin between decay and healing, that are crusted over like a scab but also glisten like jewels.

“Bone of my Bone, Flesh of my Flesh” is deeply and introspectively human and a handcrafted individual experience for each viewer. Deborah Worthy-Collins is electric in her latest exhibition. If there is one truth to be gleaned from this show, there is no one way to experience this exhibition, as there is no one way to be human.

“Bone of my Bone, Flesh of my Flesh” ran at The Lobby, September 1-13, with viewings by appointment.

Top photo by Danielle Fusco.

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003 Installation view, left to right: Teelah George, Blue Biro, 2018-2019, thread, linen and bronze, 220 x 190cm; Marzena Topka, Geometrisation of bodies (suspended animation), 2014-2019, deconstructed office clothing, dimensions variable; Susan Roux, (un) / fold (detail), 2019, Canson paper, ink, thread and polish, dimensions variable; and Ómra Caoimhe, The Sum of the Parts (detail), 2019, hand-spun tussah silk thread and wool thread, wool cloth, wooden beads, nails, bees wax and oil on curved wooden panel, loom parts and wooden spool, dimensions variable. Photograph by Lyle Branson.
News, Reviews, Visual arts

A material world

Review: Joanna Sulkowski, ‘HERE&NOW19: Material Culture’ ·
Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery ·
Review by Miranda Johnson ·

As the name implies, Lawrence Wilson Gallery’s annual “HERE&NOW” exhibition is all about contemporary art practice in WA, at this moment in time. Now in its seventh year, the exhibition gives an emerging curator the opportunity to offer their take on the subject.

For “HERE&NOW19”, it is emerging curator and artist Joanna Sulkowski’s turn at the helm. Under the title “Material Culture”, Sulkowski brings together a selection of works that both examine our collective cultural obsession with the “material world” of production, trade and business, and reflect upon the ways in which materials themselves play a significant role in the way we comprehend the world around us.

Featuring five WA artists, this year’s ‘HERE&NOW” feels more scaled back than previous iterations; the open gallery space seeming ever-so-slightly cavernous. The exhibition touches upon the broadness of the phrase “material culture”, which most commonly refers to fabrics but also to thread, paper, plastic and yarn; each artist’s work employing a different engagement with the ongoing process of making.

Teelah George, 'Blue Biro', 2018-2019, thread, linen and bronze, 220 x 190cm. Photo: Lyle Branson.
Teelah George, ‘Blue Biro’, 2018-2019, thread, linen and bronze, 220 x 190cm. Photo: Lyle Branson.

This link between the materiality of the object and the process by which this materiality was realised is a notable point of commonality between the works. The repetitive nature of production is emphasised, particularly through stitching but also in repeated shapes and forms – a literal mark-making of the time taken to create the object. We see this in the repetitive stitching in Teelah George’s Blue Biro, the title referring to a different kind of mark-making that also references the passing of time in the endless scribbling or doodling with a pen; and in the spinning of yarn by hand, a line that connects the disparate parts of Ómra Caoimhe’s installation The Sum of the Parts. Deliberately idiosyncratic arrangements of objects –  dedicated to making the fabric – together form a whole.

Central to the exhibition is Marzena Topka’s installation of office clothes, split open and hung to form a maze, reminiscent of office cubicles that function to block people from one another. The clothes, rendered into curtains and removed from any kind of gendered shape or form, remain an oppressive force. Hung above eye height, the garments impress a kind of conformity upon the viewer as they negotiate the maze of beige and cheap rayon fabric.

This response to the oppressive nature of corporate life and the mass-production of impersonal materials finds its counterpoint in Susan Roux’s (un) / fold. Here, the mutable nature of materials becomes clear, as the fabric that spreads and unfurls across the wall is in fact paper, pleated and smocked using traditional production methods to manipulate its shape and form. This labour-intensive way of making stands in sharp opposition to the mass production of most of today’s material objects. It’s a critique of industrialisation that finds a different yet complementary angle in Holly Story’s immersive and mesmerising work The Embrace, a meditation on natural environments that are constantly under threat, an ecological landscape printed on silk and cotton.

Ómra Caoimhe, The Sum of the Parts, 2019, hand-spun tussah silk thread and wool thread, wool cloth, wooden beads, nails, bees wax and oil on curved wooden panel, loom parts and wooden spool, dimensions variable. Photograph by Lyle Brason.
Ómra Caoimhe, ‘The Sum of the Parts’, 2019, hand-spun tussah silk thread and wool thread, wool cloth, wooden beads, nails, bees wax and oil on curved wooden panel, loom parts and wooden spool, dimensions variable. Photo: Lyle Brason.

In our post-industrial globalised world, material culture is associated with questions about labour and production, a deeply political issue that is touched on in this exhibition, but could have been expanded upon. Nonetheless, the works presented in “HERE&NOW19” experiment with their materials in a multitude of different ways, rewarding the viewer’s close attention.

“Here@Now19: Material Culture” runs until December 7.

Pictured top: Installation view, left to right: Teelah George, ‘Blue Biro’, 2018-2019, thread, linen and bronze, 220 x 190cm; Marzena Topka, ‘Geometrisation of bodies’ (suspended animation), 2014-2019, deconstructed office clothing, dimensions variable; Susan Roux, ‘(un) / fold’ (detail), 2019, Canson paper, ink, thread and polish, dimensions variable; and Ómra Caoimhe, ‘The Sum of the Parts’ (detail), 2019, hand-spun tussah silk thread and wool thread, wool cloth, wooden beads, nails, bees wax and oil on curved wooden panel, loom parts and wooden spool, dimensions variable. Photo: Lyle Branson.

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Outback scene with clouds and bare trees
Calendar, December 19, Featured, February 2020, January 2020, November 19, October 19, September 19, Visual arts

Visual Arts: enigmas of the outback

29 Sep – 9 Feb @ Holmes à Court Gallery at Vasse Felix ·
Presented by the Artists ·

This exhibition is about the Australian outback as an enigmatic, mysterious, spirited and haunted terrain. The selection of photographic, paint and sculptural works reflect upon how the outback triggers the imagination in unsettling ways. It is at once darkly evocative and psychologically compelling; a journey through responses to the spirituality and mythology of the Australian landscape.

Artists: Brook Andrew, Jane Burton, Rebecca Dagnall, Eva Fernandez, David Downs Jarinyanu, Nigel Hewitt, Janet Laurence, Roslynd Piggott, Polexini Papapetrou, Brad Rimmer, Jacqui Stockdale, Monique Tippet, Paul Uhlmann, Paddy Fordham Wainburranga, Toni Wilkinson.

 

More info
W: http://www.holmesacourtgallery.com.au/article/enigmas-of-the-outback-29-september-2019-9-february-2020-vasse-felix
E: Laetitia.Wilson@heytesbury.com.au

Pictured: Brad Rimmer, Crows nest #11 Booralaming, 2017, archival inkjet photograph, Courtesy of Art Collective WA

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Black background, person lying on back sleeping draped in orange chiffon fabric
Calendar, Immersive Experience, Installation, November 19

Fremantle Biennale: Somnus

8 – 10 November @ PS Art Space ·
Presented by Theatre by the Sea ·

Somnus is a radical enquiry into the nature of sleep, immersing audiences in the experiences of four sleepers as they cycle through the fear and ecstasy of REM and non-REM states. The pillared warehouse of PS Art Space will transform into an otherworld of kinetic still lives, nocturnal languages, poetry, and haunting music- scapes, where audiences roam between stages of sleep. What lights up in this panorama is our passionate search for meaning as we encounterour ‘nightself’. Conceived and written by Jennifer Kornberger, directed by Horst Kornberger, with music composed by Eva Jurgec, Somnus is a large-scale collaboration between some of Slovenia’s best performers and an outstanding ensemble of Australian artists.

Theatre of the Sea fuses multiple genres to produce installations and immersive events. Elements of site activation, theatre, ritual, live music, and poetry establish temporary sanctuaries where audiences participate in acts of transformation.

More info
W: www.fremantlebiennale.com.au
E:  info@fremantlebiennale.com.au

Pictured: Theatre of the Sea

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Night scene of building and people with blue swirling cloud effects
Calendar, Installation, November 19, Visual arts

Fremantle Biennale: WATERLICHT

1 – 3 November @ Fremantle Esplanade Park ·
Presented by Studio Roosegarde ·

An Australian premiere in Fremantle, Studio Roosegaarde will present a large-scale light installation illustrating the universal power and poetry of water. ‘WATERLICHT’ is larger-than-life; cascading waves of blue light will soar in the middle of Esplanade Park, simulating a virtual flood and calling attention to rising water levels along Fremantle’s shoreline. The work will embrace the unique physical features of the site while acknowledging its past. A soundscape will accompany the work, including local stories about Fremantle’s waterfront by traditional custodians, prominent civic figures, historians, artists and community members. These stories will live on as an enduring legacy of the work’s appearance in Fremantle, and serve as a stirring call-to-action for a city-wide conversation around clean water initiatives and climate change.

More info
W: www.fremantlebiennale.com.au
E:  info@fremantlebiennale.com.au

Pictured: Waterlicht: credit: Studio Roosegarde

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