Gabriella Munro as May and Sally Clune as Cousin. Photo: Susie Blatchford.
Immersive Experience, News, Performing arts, Reviews, Theatre

A deep dive into the heart of darkness

Review: Feet First Collective, S-27 ⋅
Fremantle Arts Centre ⋅
Review by Steven Cohen ⋅

There’s something about dystopian reality that bites, that shakes and shudders at our sensibilities. And when that “something” manifests itself in the theatre it leaves a discerning mark on the audience.

From Orwell’s’ 1984 to The Handmaids Tale, we’re used to dystopian thrillers. Audiences seem drawn to alien settings and alienated characters. The stories are riveting, the dialogue terse and the scenes dramatic.

But dystopian drama is much rarer because the style is founded in science fiction. And a theatre, by its very nature,  is a forum for collective reflection, drawing out participation and expression of popular concerns.

Good dystopian theatre will illuminate the urban and reflect the irreparable. Perhaps more than that, dystopian theatre gives us a chance to recall the true horrors of horrors so that we might learn something and begin again.

Sarah Grochala’s play S-27, first produced in London a decade ago, is better than good.  It is both tense and disturbing in recounting the tales from Khmer Rouge Cambodia.

Aptly staged in the historical asylum of the Fremantle Arts Centre, local producers Teresa Izzard and Lauren Beeton successfully manage to immerse the audience into a universal atrocity, balancing the cultural intricacies of Pol Pot’s ruthless ideology with the indignation of his horror.

To begin, we are stripped of our belongings, given numbers, separated from our partners and hoarded into a small slither of a room.  Violence is within earshot and sometimes seen.  Posters illuminate the blankness of the walls – English renditions from Pol Pot’s Little Red Book – illuminate the extremism of the revolution.  Some of the audience are pulled away. Most stay in situ and in line. Quiet and following.

Eventually we arrive in a cold dank old hall, replete with a single line of facing parallel seating with a single forward fronting chair perched alone in between. An old-style camera, the type my dad used to carry, sits on a tripod aimed at the empty chair. The theatre space is more a thriller scene. The audience become intimate witnesses.

Then we meet May, cold and tearless, whose job is to photograph the living dead. As May’s story slowly unwinds, so does she and we become witness to the frailty of human emotion and what it takes to survive a holocaust. Compassionately played by Gabriella Munro, May is the protagonist whose interactions with those she photographs underpins the production.

The seven supporting cast members are nameless. Sheathed either in black police garb or for a few, they serve as photographic fodder. Their acting is tight and well-controlled, blending erratically into the catastrophic nightmare.

Balancing the well-constructed performances is original music by Rachael Dease, haunting sound by John Congrear and claustrophobic lighting by Andrew Portwine, who successfully encase the audience’s senses in a confronting maelstrom.

This is a story that must be told.  It is uncomfortable, horrific and bloody, but important for our own humanity.  S-27 is a gem of a play.  We are lucky to have such wonderful talent in our city.

S-27 continues until July 21.

Pictured top: May (Gabriella Munro) and Cousin (Sally Clune) as photographer and subject. Photo: Susie Blatchford.

Please follow and like us:
Image of girl seated on chair with face blurred
Calendar, Immersive Experience, July 19, Performing arts

Theatre: S-27

12 – 21 July @ Fremantle Arts Centre ·
Presented by Feet First Collective ·

Feet First Collective presents the WA premiere of S-27 by Sarah Grochala cocooned within an immersive experience that unfolds inside the rooms and winding halls of the iconic Fremantle Arts Centre as part of the 2019 Fremantle Festival.

Winner of the iceandfire/Amnesty International ‘Protect the Human’ Playwriting Competition in 2007, the play was inspired by the history of Cambodia’s S-21 prison under the rule of the Khmer Rouge and draws on prison records and interviews.

S-27 is an opportunity to imagine a dark and disturbing future. This work will be of interest to theatre lovers, history buffs and Fremantle businesses looking for a really different team experience in their City. Numbers for this performance are strictly limited so early bookings are encouraged.

S-27 contains adult themes and is recommend for 15+ years. Fremantle Arts Centre is a licenced venue: 15 -18 year-olds must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

Please visit the website to check mobility requirements.

12-14 and 16-21* July
*Additional late show on 20 July (Doors open 8.30pm – Performance at 9.30pm)

Doors open: 6:30pm (Drinks available,  meet in bar area in the Cell Room)
Performance begins: 7:30pm (Cell Room and Pavlich Room)
Running time: 80mins (approximately) Ticket Price: Standard $25 +bf
Bookings: fac.oztix.com.au/default.aspx?Event=100846

More info:
https://www.fac.org.au/whats-on/post/s-27-sarah-grochala/

Please follow and like us: