Jazz, Music, News, Performing arts, Reviews

From sublime to incendiary

Review: Perth International Jazz Festival, Kristin Berardi/Sam Anning; Tal Cohen Quartet; Veronica Swift ⋅
State Theatre Centre, November 10 ⋅
Review by Garry Lee ⋅

The Perth International Jazz Festival reached its climax on Sunday with a series of contrasting concerts of world class standard. There was also a healthy dose of local musicians involved; of the seven musicians performing in the three concerts I attended, five were graduates from the West Australian Academy of Performing Arts.

On Sunday afternoon over fifty jazz aficionados were treated to the sublime sounds of vocalist Kristin Berardi and bassist Sam Anning in the Heath Ledger Theatre. The unusual duo of voice and bass does have a precedent in jazz with the pairing of United States artists Sheila Jordan and Harvie S in the 1970s. However the Berardi/Anning duo reflected more contemporary influences – think perhaps Joni Mitchell and Wendy Waldman. They also revealed broader influences including Celtic folk music such as on Anning’s composition Fields Are Sown where his arco (bowed) bass masterfully provided a sonic mood that clearly extended beyond the usual jazz idiom. US jazz pianist/composer Brad Mehldau’s Lament for Linus provided a piece that certainly was from the jazz repertoire. Mehldau was inspired by Homer’s Iliad for this composition from his 1997 Art of the Trio album and Berardi has added lyrics including a superb vocalese rendition of the original piano solo.

a bassist and vocalist share the stage
The simpatico of Sam Anning and Kristin Berardi. Photo Adele Varris.

The emphasis was on original repertoire and this duo showed why individually they are at the very top of Australia’s jazz talent. Their simpatico and virtuosity was evident on every piece and their new album Our Songs, Not Songs (Earshift Music) is certainly recommended. The sound in the theatre was excellent but it would be advisable for the front of house staff to allow patrons to enter only between tunes.

At 5pm in the State Theatre Courtyard, the Tal Cohen Quartet commenced. Israeli-born but Perth-educated pianist Cohen possesses a jazz conception that is virtuosic, lyrical, dynamic and frequently humorous. Now based in Miami, he surely has a strong jazz career to look forward to. With Jamie Oehlers on tenor saxophone, whom Cohen referred to as “my mentor and friend”, Karl Florisson (bass) and Ben Vanderwal (drums) this quartet most certainly delivered.

Tal Cohen plays the State Theatre Courtyard. Photo Mark Francesca.

Cohen set the stage for a most enjoyable set with the rarely played 1938 Sammy Fain composition I’ll Be Seeing You that was obfuscated both in its harmony and the delivery of the melody. His self-deprecating introduction to Cedar Meets the Jews was priceless; an attempt to write in the style of the late and great Cedar Walton had resulted in something more like a Jewish tune. Nevertheless, you might have heard in Cohen’s composition references to Firm Roots and Bolivia, two of Walton’s most famous compositions. The duo piece for piano and sax was exquisite and the interplay throughout between Cohen and the ever inspirational Vanderwal was a highlight.

Now to perhaps the climax of the 2019 Festival. The hard swinging trio rendition of Almost Like Being In Love, from Harry Mitchell (piano), Nick Abbey (bass) and Ben Vanderwal (drums) set the stage for 25 year old American vocal virtuoso Veronica Swift.

Swift is the daughter of vocalist Stephanie Nakasian and, as Swift described, “the great and late Hod O’Brien” (a jazz pianist of immense talent; check out Hod’s rendition of You and the Night and the Music]. Swift immediately put everyone on notice with an up-tempo rendition of Cole Porter’s I Get a Kick Out of You (with a possible implied dedication to Samantha Kerr). The tempo took no prisoners and the rhythm section was totally relaxed with the challenge.

Veronica Swift at the State Theatre Centre. Photo Mark Francesca.

Swift, who has toured with Wynton Marsalis, has jazz in her DNA and her scatting ability – where she vocally improvises over the harmony of a tune – is unbelievable. DownBeat magazine jazz critic Bill Milkowski has noted she has “perfect pitch and phrasing” and this was most evident. However her rendition of Lionel Bart’s As Long As He Needs Me from the musical Oliver showed that she can deliver a ballad emphatically. Incendiary, if not spontaneous combustion, might be a way of describing the quartet’s treatment of Bobby Timmons’ classic Dat Dere – an anthem of the gospel jazz or soul jazz sub-genre. The duo of vocals and bass on King Pleasure’s No Not Much provided a contrast and showed intelligent and mature programming from Swift.

The Ella Fitzgerald-inspired Pennies From Heaven invoked a standing ovation that required an encore. David Frishberg’s I’m Hip – a tune synonymous with the late Blossom Dearie – provided the icing on the cake.

This is Swift’s first visit to Australia where she also performed in Sydney and Melbourne. Her progress in the future will be followed by this scribe and I believe the festival pulled off a coup in presenting such a talented artist at the commencement of her career.

Pictured top: Veronica Swift wows the crowd with Harry Mitchell (piano), Nick Abbey (bass) and Ben Vanderwal (drums). Photo Mark Francesca.

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News, Performing arts, Reviews, Theatre

Old-school entertainment

AWESOME Review: Bear With Me ⋅
State Theatre Centre, October 7 ⋅
Review by Lydia Edwards⋅

It’s not every day you see bears entering an auditorium on the arms of their young owners. But Bear With Me wouldn’t have a show without them. That’s what makes this performance so enchanting — its hands-on yet entirely unpressured emphasis on audience participation.

The stage is set simply. The small auditorium at the State Theatre Centre is set with chairs, floor cushions and cardboard boxes, which immediately became seats for each bear, pig, sloth and rabbit in attendance. There is a screen between two microphones on which black-and-white images of an endearingly tattered bear engage the youngest while simple prompts provide guidance for the older children and adults in attendance.

Hosts Tyrone (David Megarrity), in fez and tuxedo, and Lesley (Samuel Vincent), in 1930s-style tweed trousers with braces, address their audience from the start as “bear experts”, giving a delightful sense of ownership and authority.

With gentle introductions and soft ukulele chords, their young audience is ushered into 45 minutes of a refreshingly old-fashioned show that considers the essence of that much-loved childhood symbol: the teddy bear.

With shades of Flanders and Swann, Tyrone and Lesley present a series of sweet, amusing short songs designed to appeal to children between the ages of 2 and 5 (one about bottoms went down especially well with my three-year-old), interspersed with musings on the nature of the Bear.

“Are we part of the bear, or is the bear part of us?” Tyrone asks, combining metaphysics with, perhaps, a genuine question as his audience gaze intently into the eyes of their little companions. This is a gentle and relaxed performance, far from the bright lights, colours and intense enthusiasm of many contemporary children’s shows.

That is probably because, in many respects, this is not contemporary. It harks back to a simpler mode of entertainment, with Lesley’s mute yet warm presence and Tyrone’s vaudevillian repartee.

In the disquiet of our times it is heartening to know that such a deceptively simple, comforting performance has the ability to engage and engross.

Bear With Me is on until October 11.

Pictured (left to right): David Megarrity as Tyrone and Samuel Vincent as Lesley in Bear With Me.  Photo: Jocelyn Vincent.

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Children, Circus, Dance, News, Physical theatre, Reviews

Blueprint for the future

AWESOME Review: DADAA and CircusWA, Experience Collider ⋅
Studio Underground, State Theatre Centre of Western Australia, October 4 ⋅
Review by Robert Housley ⋅

Experience is fundamental to our passage through life. It is how life manifests itself and how we interact with the world.

When significant boundaries inhibit the physical and psychological experience of existence, finding ways to enrich it are even more critical to a life well lived.

The 28 young people in this Awesome 2019 show – half with high-needs disabilities, half from the CircusWA Youth Troupe – embrace the joy of collaboration that has doubtless enriched the lives of all involved.

At the heart of this Sam Fox-directed performance is the desire to create a world of equality which, he suggests, could be “a blueprint for the future.”

Inclusiveness and equality go hand in hand, just as hold, the first of several themed components of the performance, proved.

The simple intimacy and symbolism of holding hands permeated the opening scenes, which had the entire cast and a fair number of the support crew intermingling on stage together. When an aerialist suspended about seat-height from the ground wrapped her arm around an electric wheelchair-bound performer and he literally took them for spin, the night was off to a brilliant start.

Electric wheelchairs abounded as did a range of circus props including aerial apparatus, landing mats and hula hoops.

Movement of all kinds – from dance to gymnastics – was integral, as was a sense of fun.

A film crew kept popping up and occasional shorts were projected onto two large screens either side of stage.

Between the screens was a large-scale revolving door-like entryway, which provided tactile curtaining and featured strongly in the most heart-warming of the short films.

The heart strings were pulled to breaking point in the joyful pas de deux between Mohammed Waheedy and Lila Campbell. Waheedy climbed unaided from his wheelchair on to a long mat, where circus performer Campbell waited, and together they choreographically rolled around for the sheer pleasure of it.

Onstage composer/musician Roly Skender provided beautiful atmospherics, enhanced with periods of live acoustic guitar.

Music for teenagers was most aptly celebrated near the end of the show with a full run of Perth band Tame Impala’s hit song “Let it Happen”.

Fox and the team of professional collaborators involved in the 18-month show development certainly did everything their power to guide this remarkable event and let the experiences happen for everyone.

Pictured top (left to right): Leila, Maddie, Hugo and Arlo   Photo: Peter Cheng.

Read reviews of ‘Experience Collider’ by Junior Critics Gabriel and Sascha Bott (age 10 and 8).

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Children, Features, News

Spring Gig Guide for Kids

Recently I attended a concert by the WA Symphony Orchestra with several eight year olds and their mothers. We sat in the choir stalls behind the orchestra where we could see the percussionist preparing the crash cymbals and watch the conductor’s face. It was such an exciting experience; the sound was so immediate and enveloping it made the skin tingle. The children were utterly transfixed and had animated discussions amongst themselves as they left the concert hall.

The experience reminded me that we don’t need to wait for special ‘children’s’ events. Children lap up mainstream exhibitions and performances right alongside their adults. If you want to try something similar over the holidays WASO are doing two very exciting programs which would be perfect: Symphonie Fantastique with a young star conductor Fabien Gabel, and Beethoven Eroica. Try the $30 choir stall tickets for a truly vivid experience.

Peter and the Wolf
The story of Peter and the Wolf will be presented by both WA Ballet and WAYO. Photo: Frances Andrijich

That said, there is also something wonderful about art made especially with children in mind. One of the highlights of the October school holidays is AWESOME Festival, an event which over it 23 year history has firmly established itself as the premier event for families and schools in Western Australia. The arts festival has been ranked as one of the top 25 events in the world for young people. The program this year is bursting with world class shows and workshops including a free performance of Peter and the Wolf by WA Ballet. Read an overview from artistic director Jenny Simpson who gave Seesaw the low down on this year’s programme.

If you want to dive deeper into the story of Peter and Wolf you can also check out the orchestral version with narrator which – in lovely synchronicity – will also be performed by the WA Youth Orchestra on October 12 and 13, perfect for children aged four and above.

More music treats (for those under seven) can be found at the WA Youth Jazz Orchestra’s Jazz for Juniors concerts on October 1st and 2nd.

In the world of theatre get ready for a hands-on, participatory experience at Spare Parts Puppet Theatre’s world premiere season of On Our Beach. Be transported to an imaginary beach where strangers become friends and you have a chance to ride a surf board, be part of sculptures by the sea, play a game of beach volleyball and swim in a sea of shimmering balls.

Fully Sikh
Sukhjit Kaur Khalsa in Fully Sikh.

Older youth might take interest in a world premiere by Black Swan State Theatre and Barking Gecko which opens October 10. Fully Sikh is a new Australian work by one of Australia’s most talented and celebrated spoken word artists. Sukhjit Kaur Khalsa made headlines around the globe when she performed a poem confronting racism on Australia’s Got Talent and went on to tour her poetry across Australia and overseas. Fully Sikh is Sukhjit’s story, features a Punjabi meal cooked live on stage and marks her highly anticipated theatre debut.

There is more theatre later in October when Eric Hill’s beloved puppy Spot arrives at the State Theatre Centre with a show full of puppetry, songs, and puzzles, suitable for children from 18 months old and their adults.

The Art Gallery of WA are offering several free workshops to coincide with Botanical Beauty and Peril. The exhibition explores the abundant beauty of the botanical world and the threats that assail it. After your visit draw a magnificent winged beauty or a frightening flight of feathers in response to the exhibition, or visit the Imagination Room and contribute to Conversations with Rain, a project exploring poetic responses to weather and our relationship to the environment and climate change.

Fremantle Arts Centre offers a variety of arts courses for kids

AGWA will also host Artmaking Workshops with Eveline Kotai. The multi-generational workshop involves constructing your own creation or working as a group. Let your imagination run free and take home your own unique piece of recycled art. And don’t forget the Fremantle Arts Centre which is a hub for art workshops for five year old through to teenagers, offering everything from anime and photography to film making and pottery.

Keep an eye on Seesaw Magazine as there will be dozens of reviews coming in over the holidays, many from our junior critics who will be keeping you informed. And don’t forget to share your own responses on our Facebook page.

 

Picture top: Awesome Festival features art events curated especially for children.

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Jazz Band in stage in quadrangle
Calendar, Jazz, Music, November 19, Performing arts

Music: Perth International Jazz Festival 2019

8-10 November @ Various Venues in Perth & Northbridge ·
Presented by Perth International Jazz Festival ·

Get jazzy with the coolest concerts from some of the world’s hottest musical talent at the Perth International Jazz Festival (PIJF) happening for one weekend only from 8 to 10 November.

Featuring free and ticketed concerts, intimate artist talks and workshops, experience new delights and reacquaint yourself with old favourites spanning big band, solo performers, instrumentalists, vocalists, contemporary and avant-garde.

The State Theatre Centre will be the Festival hub incorporating the Courtyard and Heath Ledger Theatre in ways you’ve haven’t experienced before – and all in walking distance to venues The Bird, The Ellington Jazz Club and Downstairs at the Maj, which will also be utilised across the three days.

The free-to-attend parts of the program are also bigger than ever – get set for jazzy sounds spilling out from the Perth Cultural Centre’s Wetlands Stage, The Rechabite and Birdwood Square.

More info:
perthinternationaljazzfestival.com.au/

Pictured: Perth Jazz Festival credit: Corey James

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Music, News, Performing arts, Reviews

Mix and match media

Review: Zubin Kanga ‘Piano Ex Machina’ ⋅
State Theatre Centre, April 24 ⋅
Review by Eduardo Cossio ⋅

Many contemporary composers have sought to create works that are not just for the ‘ears’ but ones that also incorporate visuals, new technologies and invite audiences to interact with or influence the performances. London-based pianist Zubin Kanga was in Perth last Wednesday to present Piano Ex Machina, his third instalment in a series of concerts exploring mass media and new musical interfaces. Presented by Tura New Music at the State Theatre Centre, the recital featured new Australian works as well as a piece by the German composer Alexander Schubert.

WIKI-PIANO.NET is part of Schubert’s Community Pieces, a series of works whose content can be edited by online users. The piece recreates the disparate world of cyberculture by having a website as its score. Kanga becomes a conduit for a series of disjointed actions, visuals and musical fragments where the strands of a Beethoven piano sonata co-exist with Tom and Jerry videos. Kanga’s delivery is deadpan as he follows the absurd instructions on the webpage, like hitting his forehead with the palm of his hand and then facing the audience to apologize repeatedly. The eccentric stunts are interspersed with musical material that ranges from atonal classical music to commercial pop. The performer’s body and the situation are in the foreground and Kanga is convincing at harnessing the energy and irreverence of the work.

A focus on physicality and the absurd is also present in Jon Rose’s Ballast, an updated version of his work with motion-sensor technology in the eighties and nineties. It starts with Kanga playing several runs at fast speed. The mechanical-like patterns are reminiscent of Conlon Nancarrow’s works for player piano and its digital counterpart in the nineties, Black MIDI. Along with the dense, dissonant playing, Kanga triggers electronic samples by waving a motion-sensor ring in his right hand. The performance builds into to a frenzy before Kanga starts pacing around the piano flailing his arms like a man possessed. Ballast is all that you would expect from a Jon Rose composition; it is virtuosic, in your face, and full of wacky antics.

More use of sampling comes in Tristan Coelho’s Rhythm City, which sees the performer manipulating everyday sounds and video-clips with a MIDI controller. Kanga makes the videos stutter and glitch, looping them forwards and backwards. The piece is a feature for his virtuoso keyboard technique; he pummels the piano during the jazz-inflected passages and regains his composure in the minimalist figures. Despite an effective synchronization of the visual and piano parts, I found the electronic samples became overly familiar after a while.

Kate Neal’s A Novel Piano features an animated film by Sal Cooper along with theatrical props on stage and an acting role for Zubin Kanga. The work is adapted from the hour-long music-theatre piece, While We Sleep. The video presents whimsical sequences of books morphing into a piano and onstage Kanga breaks the third wall by leafing through paperbacks and drinking from a mug. Apart from the brief theatrical section at the beginning, A Novel Piano functions more as a soundtrack to the animated film. Visuals, theatre and sound are an ongoing concern in Neal’s work; however, they do not seem fully integrated in this standalone work.

A real sense of exploration with the sonic material is present in Zubin Kanga’s Transformations, which in contrast to the more art music oriented pieces in the program, delves into electronic dance music with a decidedly experimental bent. Low clusters of sound are contrasted with arpeggiated patterns on a synthesiser, and the stark mood pervading the work makes it revelatory of Kanga’s musical personality. The exploratory streak continues with Benjamin Carey’s Taking the Auspices, a piece of computer-generated visuals and semi-improvised playing. Carey has devised an artificial intelligence environment where the performer is in interaction with computer algorithms that listen to and respond to the performance. The interactions yield sympathetic results and push Kanga into an abstract musical language. On a screen, fractal-like visuals follow the ebb and flow of the performance. Taking the Auspices is a work combining complex programming technology with a warm and sensitive realization.

Closing the concert is Transplant the Movie 2! by Adam De La Cour, a short film that parodies eighties action films and video games. Despite the crude visuals (think Adult Swim and Troma Entertainment) the feature has a strong narrative line, including a memorable AMEB spoof featuring the Australian composer Neil Luck.

As entertaining as these works are, Piano Ex Machina relies a bit too much on irony and pastiche. In my opinion, the most affecting moments in the concert come during the works of Zubin Kanga and Benjamin Carey, for these engage with the audio-visual medium in more exploratory, inquisitive ways.

Picture top: Zubin Kanga at the intersection of technology and piano. Photo Raphael Neal.

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Children, News

Kids Autumn Gig Guide

As we approach the school holidays the arts scene is cranking up for kids.

The West Australian Symphony Orchestra is offering two movie screenings with live soundtrack: Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire on March 29/30 and The Little Mermaid on April 26/27. Did you know it has been 30 years since Disney released The Little Mermaid? Dust off the costumes and get ready to sing along to Alan Menken’s Academy Award-winning score!

WA has two youth orchestras and both offer hands-on concerts tailored for children. On April 6/7 the WA Youth Orchestra invites children aged 2–8 to experience live music in an up-close and personal setting. At Babies Proms concerts children learn about the instruments, are invited to conduct the orchestra and can join the musicians on stage. Also popular with kids and the carers, the WA Youth Jazz Orchestra’s similar Jazz for Juniors series on April 16-17 includes a have-a-go session at the end of the show.

Underwater image of diver and sea creature
Puppets tell the story in Spare Parts Puppet Theatre’s Blueback.

During the school holidays (April 13-27) Spare Parts Puppet Theatre will reprise an adaption of Tim Winton’s Blueback. The moving story captures the mystery of the sea and the majesty of an old fish called Blueback. The audience follows Abel’s journey from inquisitive boy to a man prepared to stand up for what he loves and believes in.

Youth Week WA also coincides with the school holidays and Propel Youth is celebrating with their annual KickstART Festival from April 13-20. On offer are 40 free events and workshops celebrating the positive contributions young people make to our community. Craft, songwriting, collage, puppetry and a huge variety of classes are on offer for youth aged 12-26.

There are some great holiday courses available for children. Fremantle Arts Centre offers two and three-hour classes including sessions on how to make your own piggy bank, t-shirt, cuddly toy, or explorations into photography, pottery and animation. Barking Gecko‘s drama classes on April 16-18 look great, with a fairy tale theme and classes catering for ages 5-7  and 8-12.

The State Theatre is hosting two shows touring nationally with CDP Theatre Producers: Room on the Broom, based on Julia Donaldson’s much loved classic (April 23-28) and Billionaire Boy based on David Williams hilarious children’s book (April 24-27). CDP Theatre are the team behind The Gruffulo’s Child and The 13-, 26-, 52- and 78-Storey Treehouses and are pretty reliable for a great live show.

Finally, on May 18 one of my favourite music educators Paul Rissmann returns to WASO for another EChO concert. Backed by an 11-piece orchestra Rissmann will explore the gorgeous children’s books The Giddy Goat and The Lion Who Loved in his gently invitational and entertaining style.

Dive into the arts with your family and enjoy the magic that is autumn in Perth!

Pictured top: children get hands on at Jazz for Juniors.

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Fringe World, News, Performing arts, Reviews, Theatre

Wheels on fire

Fringe World review: Tim Ferguson – A Fast Life on Wheels ·
Midar Room, State Theatre Centre, February 1 ·
Review by David Zampatti ·

It’s impossible not to feel sorry for Tim Ferguson. Not that he’d want us to. It’s also impossible not to forgive him for feeling sorry for himself. And we do.

Ferguson, of course, was the tall (unlike Paul McDermott) non-conversationalist (unlike Richard Fidler) Doug Anthony All Star whose career – or at least that part of it – was cut short by multiple sclerosis.

Now wheelchair-bound, crippled in one arm, hard of hearing, dim of sight, foggy of memory and nappied of plumbing, he’s a walking, well, a wheeling, testament to the sheer horribleness of a disease that basically lurks in the brain looking for things to attack.

Ferguson is, of course, something of an attack dog himself, and there’s some delight in watching his assault on convention – and unconvention – through the video clips from the All Stars and shows like Don’t Forget Your Toothbrush that liberally sprinkle the show.

His description of Nine network emperor Kerry Packer smothering him in a bear hug and telling him how everyone loves him (that’s how the very rich sack you, says Ferguson) was comedy gold; there was nothing funny, though, in a clip showing him interminably and painfully walking to the door with the aid of a rollator to let his helper in.

There were also some revealing anecdotes, in particular the story of his father, Tony, a celebrated war correspondent, who ventured in to Cambodia during the Vietnam War to interview journalist and accused traitor Wilfred Burchett; Ferguson Snr sent his tapes back to the ABC which, under political pressure, burned them. Don’t think ABC-bashing is a recent innovation!

Ferguson, as he tells us, has forged a new career as a motivational speaker and trainer, and he speaks with some pride about his success.

I admire his courage; I also admire his chutzpah.

I suspect he needs lots of both.

Tim Ferguson – A Fast Life on Wheels is on at the State Theatre Centre until February 3.

Pictured top: Tim Ferguson pulling out all stops.

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MoveMe Festival
Calendar, Dance, Performing arts, September 18

Dance: MoveMe Festival 2018

11 – 22 September @ State Theatre Centre and Surrounds ·
Presented by Ausdance WA ·

MoveMe Festival 2018 will make a huge splash across the State Theatre Centre of WA and nearby between 11 and 22 September, showcasing new contemporary dance work from the state’s leading independent choreographers, dancers and more. MoveMe Festival 2018 offers dance that is everything from captivating and thoughtful to unashamedly hilarious and exhilarating.

You are invited to take full advantage of new and innovative contemporary dance through MoveMe Festival 2018. We’ve created MoveThree, a 10% discount offer when you purchase tickets to three festival shows – Co3 Australia’s WA Dance Makers Project, Kynan Hughes’ Love/Less with STRUT Dance’s NEXT, and The Farm’s Cockfight.

Take advantage of discount offers to other festival programs, Dust on the Shortbread and WAB’s Dracula.

SeeMe is a program of free events across the festival including site-specific works and showings of Sunset (STRUT Dance) and Amity (Talitha Maslin and Dane Yates).

DUST ON THE SHORTBREAD
Anything is Valid Dance Theatre
Secret location at a suburban house in North Perth
6:30 p.m. 11 – 15 & 18 – 22 September
Tickets $30 – 35*

WA DANCE MAKERS PROJECT 2018
Co3 Australia
Studio Underground
7:30 p.m. 12 – 15 September
12:00 p.m. 14 September
5:00 p.m. 16 September
Tickets $35*

LOVE/LESS
New trio by Kynan Hughes
Studio Underground
6:00 p.m. 19 – 22 September
Tickets $30 – $35*

NEXT
STRUT Dance
Presented with Love/Less at Studio Underground

COCKFIGHT
The Farm
Heath Ledger Theatre
8:00 p.m. 19 – 22 September
Tickets $35*

More info
W: moveme.org.au
E:  dance@moveme.org.au

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