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Features/Fringe World Festival/Multi-arts

Five things you need to know about Fringe World

4 December 2020

Summer is here and tickets are now on sale for FRINGE WORLD 2021. Some things will be a bit different this year but Seesaw has all your questions answered.

Festival season is coming and it is time to start planning your summer of fun! Here is what you need to know:

1. Fringe World is going ahead! The 2021 Festival runs 15 January to 14 February at more than 120 venues across the city. Festival director Amber Hasler says,

“WA is the best place to be right now and Fringe World will be the most fun place to enjoy all that’s good about summertime in our sensational state”.  

The Woodside Pleasure Garden at FRINGE WORLD. Photo by Jarrad Seng

2. There are COVID precautions. There will be measures in place at venues to ensure everyone feels COVID-safe, and if a show is cancelled or if ticket holders have COVID-19 symptoms they can get a refund. Yep, a whole new level of flexibility.

Red hot ticket: Jamie Mykaela’s feminist cabaret show ‘DADDY’ as part of State of Play. Photo supplied.

3. You need the app. There is no printed program this year and while you can access the program on the website the app makes life SO MUCH easier. It is more streamlined and users can get personalised recommendations, create their own calendar, access tickets and use the Shake to Search function to find a random show starting nearby. The program will continue to change as borders open and new artists come onboard and the app will keep you up to speed.

4. WA Artists are centre stage. The festival will be smaller this year (approx. 450 shows rather than the 700 in 2020) due to the drop in interstate and international artists. This will allow more airtime for our world class local talent and it’s a good thing, given the damage our arts industry has suffered this year. Try something unknown, support local, and you may be pleasantly surprised.

5. Where to start. If you’re not sure where to start, Seesaw’s tip is to check out the curated programs. These venues aren’t going to let just anyone jump onstage, and their programs will be well worth your time. Check out the State Theatre Centre’s State of Play, Ellington Jazz Club, and Aces at the Maj.

Fringe World 2021 runs 14 January – 15 February.

Picture top: Tickets are now on sale for FRINGE WORLD Festival 2021. Photo by Jason Matz.

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Author —
Rosalind Appleby

Rosalind Appleby is an arts journalist, author and speaker. She is co-editor of Seesaw Magazine, author of Women of Note, and has written for The West Australian, The Guardian, The Australian, Limelight magazine and Opera magazine. She loves the percussion instruments which can be found in the uber cool parks.

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